The talk of the town concerns ecumenical relations in San Francisco

I see this is being talked about on private lists and other blogs, so why not mine?  Here’s a bit from Father Z’s blog to bring you up to date:

The other day Archbishop Cordileone was “installed” (a fitting word given the shape of the Cathedral in San Francisco).  You may recall that just days before the installation the Episcopalian (Episcopal) “Bishop” of California, Marc Andrus, wrote a hit piece, distorting Catholic doctrine concerning pastoral care of homosexual persons.  I wrote about Andrus HERE.  Among the ways Andrus bashed the Catholic Church and denigrated Archbp. Cordileone, there was also this:

Claiming that the appointment of Archbishop Cordileone was met with mixed reactions by San Franciscans of “all or no faith tradition,” Bishop Andrus invited Catholics “less at home” with their new bishop to “come to The Episcopal Church.

At the end of my post about “Bishop” Andrus I wrote this:

I hope Archbp. Cordileone declines the first opportunity to share a worship space with this guy.

Stop the presses!

First, the website of the Episcopal Diocese of California issued a statement. (There isn’t a time stamp on the original post HERE, but the update shows that the Piskies fired the first shot).  In that first statement, the Episcopalians explain that Andrus was not allowed to participate at the installation of Archbishop Cordileone.

There is some back and forth between the archdiocese and the Episcopalians, with differing accounts of why Andrus did not get seated.

Me?  For whatever reason, I’m glad he did not sit in choir or process in with bishops of real churches.   I really detest ecumenism of the lowest-common-denominator kind.

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4 Responses to The talk of the town concerns ecumenical relations in San Francisco

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: There is some back and forth between the archdiocese and the Episcopalians, with differing accounts of why Andrus did not get seated.

    Me? For whatever reason, I’m glad he did not sit in choir or process in with bishops of real churches. I really detest ecumenism of the lowest-common-denominator kind.

    The present Catholic custom is to seat clergy of separated Christian churches who attend major Catholic services in their official capacity, wearing their “choir dress” or equivalent, in a place befitting their positions of pastoral leadership — usually to either side of the altar within the sanctuary, if there’s sufficient space there, whether they posess valid sacramental orders or not. It is not uncommon to see a few ministers of Baptist, Evangelical, and Pentecostal churches, dressed in ordinary business suits, among them. In this context, the (apparently quite deliberate) decision not to seat the Episcopal bishop among the clergy of other denominations is undisputably a major jilt. Unfortunately, I get only headlines (no text) when I follow the links in this article, but I would love to know what provoked this. Bishop Andrus must have said something completely out of line about the new archbishop.

    We can hope and pray that Bishop Andrus’s actions additionally will provoke Archbishop Cordileone to take the additional step of helping former Anglicans in his diocese to organize into “Anglican Use” communities throughout his archdiocese, and that those communities will become magnets for orthodox members of The Episcopal Church (TEC) who live there.

    Norm.

    • William Tighe says:

      Here’s what he wrote, Norm:

      Letter to the Diocese of California concerning the installation of Salvatore Cordileone as Archbishop of San Francisco

      Dear Ones,

      On the Feast of Saint Francis, patron saint of our city by the bay, Salvatore Cordileone will be installed as the Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Francisco. The announcement of his appointment by Pope Benedict has come with mixed reactions and feelings from San Franciscans of all or no faith tradition. Bishop Cordileone was an active supporter of Proposition 8, which I and the other Episcopal bishops throughout California opposed.

      Despite this difference of opinion and support, I look forward to working with Archbishop-designate Cordileone when and how we can, remembering as the Apostle Paul writes that we are one body, united by one Lord, one faith, and one baptism. Christianity has a long tradition of the faithful disagreeing with one another yet working together for common mission for the building of the Reign of God.

      Archbishop-designate Cordileone’s predecessor and I have worked closely and fruitfully on reducing extreme poverty globally through the Millennium Development Goals. At the same time as we did this important work together, we took very different public positions on Proposition 8. We can and must both work together for the world’s good, and it is equally important, as I say in most of my blessings at the conclusion of the Eucharist, that “we make no peace with oppression.” The recognition of the dignity and rights, within civil society and the Church of lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgendered people, and of women are as core to our proclamation of the Gospel as our solidarity with the poor, with victims of violence and political oppression, and with the Earth.

      Archbishop-designate Codelione and I share concerns for the treatment of immigrants to this country and reforming the United States’s immigration policies. Working to alleviate global poverty and change systems that disenfranchise all people are the concerns of those who follow our brother Christ, and that work is not limited to the work of bishops.

      In working together with the Archdiocese of San Francisco, however, I will not change my course with regard to the full inclusion of all people in the full life of the church. I hope that public disagreements can be handled respectfully and that criticisms of public statements may be met with mutual respect. Some Catholics may find themselves less at home with Salvatore Cordileone’s installation and they may come to The Episcopal Church. We should welcome them as our sisters and brothers.

      Even as we welcome those who may join us and look for ways to work with our Roman Catholic siblings in the faith, we will not be silenced in our proclamation of God’s inclusion. Our ecumenical partnership should be founded in our following Christ and shared service. It is our Christian duty to take stands in public or from our pulpits when others — especially those of our own faith — are in error and trying to suppress the rights of others who, too, have been created in God’s image.

      I hope that we may move forward together in ministry and faith in a way that bears witness to the unity of Christianity without necessitating uniformity. I look forward to attending Salvatore Cordileone’s installation as Archbishop of San Francisco and working with him in the future.

      +Marc Handley Andrus
      Episcopal Bishop of California

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Professor,

        You wrote: Here’s what he wrote, Norm…

        Thank you very much for supplying the text of this letter.

        It’s quite interesting that the Episcopal bishop should put so much weight on inclusion. That clearly is not the stance of scripture, as we see very clearly in the first letter to the Corinthinas, which tells its recipients quite bluntly to expel those who engage in immoral sexual behavior from the community of faith and to have nothing whatsoever to do with them.

        Norm.

    • Continental Catholic says:

      You wrote: “Bishop Andrus must have said something completely out of line about the new archbishop.”
      Well, in a public letter to his flock he wrote:
      “The announcement of his [Salvatore Cordileone] appointment by Pope Benedict has come with mixed reactions and feelings from San Franciscans of all or no faith tradition. Bishop Cordileone was an active supporter of Proposition 8, which I and the other Episcopal bishops throughout California opposed. (…) Some Catholics may find themselves less at home with Salvatore Cordileone’s installation and they may come to The Episcopal Church. We should welcome them as our sisters and brothers.”
      Nevertheless, It was quite unfortunate (even though somewhat understandable) that some overzealous diocesan worker decided to keep bp Andrus in sacristy a little too long, as he was an invited guest anyway.

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