I have been asked to take the Houston post down

By Susan Gibbs, who handles communications for the Ordinariate.

The reason is possible sensitivities regarding individuals who attended the formation weekend who may be at different stages in the process.

I am happy to oblige as it is not my intention to spook anyone or get them in trouble with their present ecclesial superiors.

I hope my readers who have reposted my Houston posts will consider the sensitivities.

 

 

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7 Responses to I have been asked to take the Houston post down

  1. Don Henri says:

    What I think is that it’s very dangerous for those priests to be identified (for example the one was identified by his location and the branch of the Church where he is carrying his ministry) as possible future ordinariate clergy by people in their actual denomination who might not be aware of the move they are preparing to do, and possibly not well-intentioned toward them.

    + PAX et BONUM

  2. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: The reason is possible sensitivities regarding individuals who attended the formation weekend who may be at different stages in the process.

    I am happy to oblige as it is not my intention to spook anyone or get them in trouble with their present ecclesial superiors. (boldface added)

    It’s the part about “get[ting] them into trouble with their present ecclesial superiors” that is the real issue here. When the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham was in its formative stages, several of the now former Anglican clergy who had not yet resigned from their offices in the Church of England had parishionners pressing them as to their intent, presumably so those parishionners could figure out their own way forward. Pretty universally, the response was along the lines of “Right now, I can only say that I am exploring the opportunity.” The gist was that any further statement would have constituted either resignation or grounds for removal at a time when they were still dependent upon the income from their positions. But until there’s a formal resignation, there’s still, at least theoretically, an opportunity to withdraw from the ordinariate’s formation program and retain their present offices.

    Norm.

  3. Pingback: Ordinariate Censorship? Or Covert Action? « Fr Stephen Smuts

  4. BCCatholic says:

    To me it seems reminiscent of being afraid of getting in trouble with your partner because you were spotted out on a date with someone else. Further, once one has decided that one’s orders are absolutely null and utterly void it is probably time to stop drawing a salary for exercising them.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      BCCatholic,

      You wrote: Further, once one has decided that one’s orders are absolutely null and utterly void it is probably time to stop drawing a salary for exercising them.

      I agree completely that continuing to exercise orders that one believes to be null and void would show an utter lack of personal integrity.

      Nonetheless, former Anglican clergy who come into the Catholic Church are not required to make any explicit acknowledgement of the nullity of Anglican orders, nor are they required in any way to deny the efficacy of their previous ministries as Anglican clergy. Although one can argue that acceptance of absolute ordination from a Catholic bishop constitutes an implicit acknowledgement that the orders received from an Anglican bishop are in some way defective, there’s still a big leap from defective to invalid that former Anglican clergy need not make prior to reception into the full communion of the Catholic Church.

      Further, clergy coming into the Catholic Church with congregations bear an obligation to sustain the ministry needed to keep the congregation together until the reception of the whole congregation into the Catholic Church. Thus, the clergy find themselves walking a tightrope up to the time of reception. The Vatican clearly has seen fit to take a pragmatic approach here, obviously tolerating without question the continuation of active ministry up to the time of reception into full communion.

      Norm.

      • Paul Nicholls ofs says:

        Bottom line is that you can only sit on the fence for so long and then you have to stick your neck out and put yourself on the line, as I had to do when I left the Anglican Church for Rome a number of years ago. Sure, I didn’t lose my salary or pension, but I sure faced a lot of derision from family, colleagues at work,from certain sectors of our society etc. The fact is that making such a decision involves sacrifice and I can only admire those clergy in the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada who spent little time fence sitting and made the plunge. Some of them have paid dearly for it in a number of ways, which I won’t get into here.

      • grahame thompson says:

        Paul, your experience is mine. I feel I am viewed like some strange incomprehensible beast by some family and friends since I entered full communion. I expected this. What is harder to take is the same treatment from fellow catholics.C

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