A marvelous homily from Cardinal Marc Ouellet

Cardinal Marc Ouellet, prefect of the Congregation for Bishops, delivers a homily on Easter III for the bishops of England and Wales.   Here’s an excerpt (my emphases):

What happens in the personal encounter with Jesus on the shore? We see that Jesus first speaks. He asks questions, questions that make the Apostles uncomfortable: “Have you caught anything?” and “Peter, do you love me?” Peter and the Apostles were fishing. Fishing was what they knew best; it was a skill and a trade they were good at. And yet it is here in this place of security and control where they meet failure and frustration. They had caught nothing; their nets were empty. Peter had denied Jesus.

Jesus’ questions reveal the Apostles’ weakness and failure, but at the same time lead them to a deeper and more intimate relationship of trust with the Lord. Through the uncomfortable questions, Peter and his brother Apostles come to encounter the Risen Christ and enter into deeper communion with Him. How can they enter into His love and intimate friendship if they do not allow Him to cut away from their hearts all that which gets in the way?

Brothers, there is nothing more important than our personal relationship with Jesus, who every day asks you and me the question he asked St. Peter, “Do you love me?” He wants us to remain in Him as His most intimate friends. What is our response to Him? To enter into this time of renewal, I would encourage all of you to enter into the uncomfortable questions, allowing Jesus’ words to have their intended effect.

Pope Francis, also makes us feel uncomfortable. One thing I have noticed, even in my personal meetings with him, is that Pope Francis’ sole criterion is Jesus Christ. The Holy Father does not get distracted by peripheral considerations. He goes to the heart of things with simplicity and boldness. You recall that just two days after his election he said to the Cardinal Electors gathered in Rome: “If we do not profess Jesus Christ, things go wrong. We may become a charitable NGO, but not the Church, the Bride of the Lord …. When we do not profess Jesus Christ, we profess the worldliness of the devil, a demonic worldliness” (Homily from Missa pro Ecclesia with the Cardinal Electors, March 14,2013).

This is beautiful. Are you allowing Jesus to ask you the hard questions?  To expose to you where you deny Him?

 

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8 Responses to A marvelous homily from Cardinal Marc Ouellet

  1. Indeed Jesus Christ, or now from His Pauline place of “Christ Jesus” (Risen & Ascended…the Mediator in His Lordship), HE always asks us the “hard questions”! But, always.. and surely at the Bema-Seat, He will ask: What have you become for and “in” ME, ‘In Christ’?! I pray “Disciples” of Christ Jesus Himself! God In Christ will have us “real” before Him! (2 Cor. 4: 13-15, etc.)

    John of the Cross could write: “When the evening of this life comes we shall be judged on Love.” And for me this “love” of Christ is demanding in His grace & glory!

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Fr. Robert,

      You wrote: Indeed Jesus Christ, or now from His Pauline place of “Christ Jesus”…

      It is important to remember that “Christ” (Greek: Chistos) is NOT a surname or family name, but rather a title meaning “anointed one.” Thus, “Jesus Christ” and “Christ Jesus” are fully interchangeable.

      Norm.

      • @Norm: I am quoting St. Paul’s statement biblically & theologically of “Christ Jesus”…the Glorified Man on the Throne of God, i.e. “the man Christ Jesus” (1 Tim. 2: 5)! Btw, the Offices of Christ (prophet, priest & king), supply the great place our “Christ Jesus”, our Mediator! Indeed now Christian theology must ever insist that Jesus’ person and work interpret each other in indissoluble unity! As Peter’s earliest confession of faith…”The Christ of God”! (Matt. 16: 16)

        To know Christ is to know His benefits! And we have no Christ without a biblical Christology!

      • PS..See the Greek Text of 1 Tim. 2: 5…”Christ Jesus” (I don’t have the Greek Text apparatus for my computer, or I would use it. I read my Greek NT every A.M.! (As asked of the Anglican presbyter at ordination!) ;)

  2. Pingback: A marvelous homily from Cardinal Marc Ouellet | Catholic Canada

  3. Patrick-TAC says:

    Thank you for this sermon, this is what Christ want us to keep on discussing instead of asking whois the true or failse Catholic or Catholic-C or c. I am a Catholic Reverend from Traditional Anglican Church (TAC). I apologise to Almighty and to people I have offended during the time when Iargued vigorously in defence of my Church oppossing Deborah’s argument. How I wish that we as Christiaans can dwell much on what the scripture teaches us and to all the representations that unite us or common to us instead of trying to say my Church is the True or Perfect one, after all Human Church is not perfect for some of our Church fore Fathers had erred and we are not here to judge them but to stick to what is right and preach the Word of God. Thank to Cardinal Ouellet and for this conversation.

  4. Rev22:17 says:

    Patrick,

    You wrote: I apologise to Almighty and to people I have offended during the time when Iargued vigorously in defence of my Church oppossing Deborah’s argument. How I wish that we as Christiaans can dwell much on what the scripture teaches us and to all the representations that unite us or common to us instead of trying to say my Church is the True or Perfect one, after all Human Church is not perfect for some of our Church fore Fathers had erred and we are not here to judge them but to stick to what is right and preach the Word of God.

    Amen!

    The very real truth is that we cannot build up and tear down at the same time. When we are tearing down others, we are not building up the Body of Christ, which is what our Lord calls us to do. At the end of the Last Supper, our Lord clearly expressed his will that all believers would be one body (“ut unam sint“) in the form of a prayer (see John 17) — and that remains our Lord’s will for all believers today.

    With respect to that which divides us, the Second Vatican Council had much to say. In particular, the following statement in the first paragraph of No. 3 in the declaration Unitatis redintegratio is a significant admission.

    But in subsequent centuries much more serious dissensions made their appearance and quite large communities came to be separated from full communion with the Catholic Church – for which, often enough, men of both sides were to blame.

    I’m not persuaded that the Vatican’s bureaucracies have gotten it completely right even today: there must be a path to rehabilitation for clergy who abandoned their posts because they were fleeing abuse at the hands of more senior clergy. I nevertheless fully understand the Vatican’s reluctance to risk opening a “Pandora’s Box” that would lead to petitions for exception for many others who abandoned their posts without justification. Nevertheless, the same paragraph later states our common goal.

    The differences that exist in varying degrees between them and the Catholic Church – whether in doctrine and sometimes in discipline, or concerning the structure of the Church – do indeed create many obstacles, sometimes serious ones, to full ecclesiastical communion. The ecumenical movement is striving to overcome these obstacles. But even in spite of them it remains true that all who have been justified by faith in Baptism are members of Christ’s body, and have a right to be called Christian, and so are correctly accepted as brothers by the children of the Catholic Church.

    Let us work together, as brothers and sisters in Christ, to resolve our differences and thus to heal the schisms that still divide us.

    The Spirit and the Bride say, “Come!” Let all who hear say, “Come!” Let all who are thirsty come forward; let all who desire it accept the gift of life-giving water. – Revelation 22:17

    Norm.

    • @Norm: Btw, I have a real hard time with the authority of Vat. II (note I was raised and somewhat educated Irish Roman Catholic. And I was around then too, since I am 63, 4 this year). It is even an issue with so many Roman theolog’s today! Noting the pastoral of Gaudium et spes. Even Benedict-Ratzinger did not like places in it!

      So quoting Vat. II leaves many questions to my mind!

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