How to best share Ordinariate news

We have quite a discussion going elsewhere on this blog on the difficulty in finding Ordinariate news in one place and how we might create a better clearinghouse for new information.

A  lot of the latest news has now migrated to Facebook, so if you do not have an account, I suggest you get one and friend various Ordinariate folks.

While I’m interested in contributing, I do not have the time or interest to be the main consolidator at this time.  Nor do I have the technical ability to create a blog aggregator which might be as simple as setting up the widgets on this blog for a blogroll.

But then we have official news and unofficial news.

Because we are new and we are small and at a sensitive stage in our development, I do not have an appetite for airing complaints or negative perspectives on this blog, though I might allow some leeway in the comments section.

I think this is why you do not see many comments from actual Ordinariate members and especially clergy on this blog though I know it is read.   

You can find the negative stuff out there but I am not going to link to posts I find irresponsible, overly-negative, largely based on imputing motives and conjecture and potentially harmful to our new community.  And I will also moderate comments in that vein, too.  I am especially careful about attacks on individual persons.

At the same time, I’m not interested in being the official mouthpiece of Ordinariate spin either though I am happy to pass along Ordinariate news releases from time to time.

So, what would you like to see in terms of Ordinariate news?   What do you think you are missing?  What would your ideal one-stop-shopping news portal look like? 

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36 Responses to How to best share Ordinariate news

  1. EPMS says:

    Are you saying that the reason we “do not see many comments from actual Ordinariate members and especially clergy” is because you “do not have an appetitie for airing complaints”? Or am I misreading?

    • Foolishness says:

      You are misreading. I have seldom blocked comments. Only one recently. The negative stuff tends to come from people who are interested in the Ordinariate but not part of it.

      So I have suspected sour grapes, or bitterness at the root. I just seldom get any comments at all from any Ordinariate members. Mostly just from interested bystanders.

      I don’t know why Ordinriate members don’t comment.

      • Ioannes says:

        Well, you’re right about sour grapes.

        Maybe the Ordinariate folks are just busy? Or they’re busy visiting their local Catholic parishes to find out what’s up, and to mingle in general?

  2. Pingback: How to best share Ordinariate news | Catholic Canada

  3. I would just like to hear about what is going on in other Ordinariate groups. At one time, Deborah,you were posting pictures and reports on events at Annunciation. This is the type of thing that interests me and, perhaps others. I am not suggesting that this be done frequently, but only as special events take place. I think some avenue for Ordinariate members to share about themselves may be of interest, as well. As far as sour grapes are concerned, wrangling and contention, I think a number of us are very tired about this. I don’t this type of thing should be allowed on any website serving as a clearing house for information. There are other blogs and channels where people can let off steam in com boxes. No one should become the self-appointed mouthpiece for the Ordinariate, but it would help if someone or a group of people could put together some form of newsletter with collective information from a number of Ordinariate groups. with the approval of the Ordinary and/or the Dean.My Secular Franciscan region does this on a quarterly basis and it is a great help in binding the fraternities together and serving as an effective means of communication.

  4. Ioannes says:

    There are plenty of ways to share Ordinariate News.

    1. An actual newspaper
    2. Social Media (Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Youtube Channel, GloriaTV etc.)
    3. Internet Forum (Fisheaters, Byzcath, etc.)
    4. Smoke Signals
    5. Public Access Television/EWTN-type of channel
    6. A brief announcement at the local Ordinary Catholic Parish embedded in -their- bulletins.
    7. Some publication delivered directly by mail to Ordinariate members.
    8. Telegraph cables
    9. Individual Blogs (like the stage we’re currently at.)
    10. Literal word-of-mouth. “Hey, Msgr. Steenson said this, pass it on.”

  5. donhenri01 says:

    First of all, thank you Mrs. Gyapong, for after the demise of the Anglo-Catholic, your blog became (with that of Mr. Cavanaugh) the primary source of information on what’s going on in the North-American ordinariate for us foreign supporters. And congratulations in praying 15 decades of a rosary everyday, I have so much difficulty to pray just one rosary every so often that I admire your endeavour!
    As to the future, maybe some kind of deanery newsletter such as the Anglican Catholic Chronicle of the ACCC could be created? But if it is not doable, I’d be very thankful if you post brief articles on important events you have knowledge of, such as receptions, ordinations, visitations by the ordinary… One last thing: the comment section of this blog has been also incredibly informative. Even-though they have not been numerous, comments by ordinariate clergy such as Fr. Kenyon or laypeople helped a lot to solve questions that arose.

    + pax et bonum

    • Foolishness says:

      I think there is a Deanery newsletter in the making but I do not know when it will be available or how. I would suspect it will be a pdf of some kind. Frankly, I don’t care for pdfs that much because of all the extra clicking to open things and since I’m on the computer a lot for work I don’t like to click any more than I have to.

  6. Paul Nicholls ofs says:

    I am in communication with the Dean, Fr. Lee Kenyon, on a somewhat regular basis. I will bring up the topic with him in July, when I touch bases with him. In the meantime, Right now, I think the Dean has a lot on his plate with the situation in Calgary and the clean up. I will make Ordinariate information regarding activities in the Oshawa Sodality and other communities on my blog, at http://oshawaordinariate.blogspot.ca/ as often as I can. I may provide an e mail address where such information (reports, photos could be sent in) . A representative of Rochester Ordinariate has shown some interest in some time of website to aggregate such information, even though they are outside of Canadian Deanery. I think things on this issue may be in the works, before the Fall but all this needs to be referred the Dean and the Ordinary for approval. My personal concern is that, like Deborah, I can not become the main co-coordinator of this because of other commitments. I also fear involvement in too many things could have an adverse effect on my prayer life. I think I already spend too much time on the internet. I can’t speak for you, Deborah, but you may be coming from the same angle I am on this issue.

    • Foolishness says:

      One possible solution is the creation of another group blog with a representative from each region or parish whose job it is to post pictures and news. We could have one for Canada; there could be one for the United States or one for the whole Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peters

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Deborah,

        You wrote: We could have one for Canada; there could be one for the United States or one for the whole Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peters

        It would be good to start a separate web site for the Deanery of St. John the Baptist as soon as practicable, if only because the Vatican’s intent clearly is to split it off as a separate ordinariate, probably with the same title, as soon as it attains critical mass to be sustainable. The more that’s put into place now, the easier the transition will be.

        Of course, I full well understand the reality that this work is undertaken by volunteers who have other responsibilities. You are doing a great job!

        Norm.

  7. Scott says:

    A Canadian Deanery website is needed.
    This could include posts with photos of ordinations, first masses, baptisms, confirmations, weddings, funerals and special events. Local parishes/groups could submit these to the webmaster. Comments should be striclty censored. The national website should not be a venue for people to grind axes. The role of the website should be to promote the Ordinariate, and should foucus on evangelization.
    There could be posts on music, ceremony, vestments – generally the liturgical arts.
    A section for catechesis is also needed.
    There might also be a section that is used for groups to help each other. St. X needs a green cope; St. Y has two, but needs a processional cross; St. Z has more stuff than they need. The website could help groups work together.
    Just a few ideas.

  8. (Fr.) Mario R. Claro says:

    A clearing house of Ordinariate news would be great. In our Roman rite parish here in West Virginia, we have made a commitment to the Ordinariate to pray for its mission and ministry. And this we do daily. But it would be good to have news about how the Ordinariate is doing and what are the special intentions we should be praying for.

  9. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You said: Because we are new and we are small and at a sensitive stage in our development, I do not have an appetite for airing complaints or negative perspectives on this blog, though I might allow some leeway in the comments section.

    I think this is why you do not see many comments from actual Ordinariate members and especially clergy on this blog though I know it is read.

    Unfortunately, the situation will remain very sensitive for the foreseeable future, and quite probably forevermore, because clergy of the Anglican tradition who are “exploring” reception into an ordinariate typically cannot say any more than that, at least publicly, without forfeiting their positions of ministry and thus their sustenance and, in many cases, their homes. And even after reception of former Anglican clergy and congregations into the full communion of the Catholic Church, the policy of the Catholic Church is to refrain from issuing press releases that might come across as rubbing the noses of the denominations from which they came in the fact of the departure. Thus, the only indication that a community is now part of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter typically is the addition of the community to the list of communities on that ordinariate’s web site whenever that list subsequently gets updated. Unfortunately, this creates a major gap in information about former Anglican communities and congregations that get received into a diocese for some period of time with the intent to move to the ordinariate some time later (typically upon the ordination as Catholic presbyters of their former Anglican clergy).

    You asked: So, what would you like to see in terms of Ordinariate news? What do you think you are missing? What would your ideal one-stop-shopping news portal look like?

    Right now, the most important information would be details of former Anglican parishes and clergy that have come into the Catholic Church but that have not made it into the ordinariate. The members of these congregations undoubtedly have the sense that they are in a holding pattern, and it would be encouraging to many of them to know that they are neither alone nor forgotten — and once they have been received into the full communion of the Catholic Church, there is no need to conceal that fact. Also, the numbers of those who are still on the way into the ordinariate would be an encouragement to all.

    In particular, I’m curious as to the fate of former parishes and clergy of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) and the Anglican Church in America (ACA) that indicated intent to come into the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. North of the border, the March 2012 issue of the ACCC “Diocesan Circular” lists the following pastors and congregations as coming to the ordinariate, but they do not yet appear in the list of ordinariate communities.

    * Fr David Skelton (Fellowship of Blessed John Henry Newman, Edmonton)

    * Fr Jim Tilley (Good Shepherd, Oshawa)

    * Fr Gérard Trinque (Christ the King, Tyendinaga)

    * Fr Doug Nicholson (St Athanasius, Montreal)

    * Fr Charles Warner (Holy Cross, Sydney Forks)

    * Fr Chris Le Page (St Thomas More, Charlottetown)

    In the ACA, there was an ordinariate-bound parish in Hawai’i, and I’m not sure how many others, that have disappeared completely from the ACA web site but do not yet appear in the listing on the ordinariate web site. If all of these communities are still on track to come into the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter, most likely soon after the ordination of their former Anglican clergy as Catholic presbyters, that ordinariate will see significant growth in the very near future!

    Norm.

    • All I can say about the Oshawa Sodality (James Tilley) is that there has been an important development and we could be in the Ordinariate ” before the snow flies.” A more specific announcement may be forthcoming in the weeks ahead. We are holding our own here and the attendance at liturgies has been boosted by the attendance of a number of traditionally minded Catholics (on the Sundays we have mass). Our main problem is having a priest on a regular and consistent basis to celebrate Sunday mass. I think when we have our own priest we will begin to show positive signs of growth.

      • EPMS says:

        Apropos of the last comment by “Catholic Left”, the ACCC website is up to date enough to have removed the Harrises’ former parish from the rolls, so I think it is being reasonably well-maintained.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Paul,

        You wrote: All I can say about the Oshawa Sodality (James Tilley) is that there has been an important development and we could be in the Ordinariate ” before the snow flies.” A more specific announcement may be forthcoming in the weeks ahead.

        That is certainly encouraging!

        You wrote: We are holding our own here and the attendance at liturgies has been boosted by the attendance of a number of traditionally minded Catholics (on the Sundays we have mass).

        Those “traditionally minded Catholics” obviously cannot officially join the ordinariate congregation, but their contributions to the collection when they come to mass certainly can bolster its finances!

        You wrote: Our main problem is having a priest on a regular and consistent basis to celebrate Sunday mass. I think when we have our own priest we will begin to show positive signs of growth.

        Yes, I agree!

        And, reading between the lines, it sounds like the solution to this problem is imminent! ;-)

        Norm.

    • CatholicLeft says:

      The community in Hawaii is not now seeking entrance into the Ordinariate and their priest, Fr Wheeler, has posted that he is no longer seeking admission into the RC Church.
      The Edmonton community in Canada is still in existence under the leadership of David Skelton with Sacramental provision presently offered by a Fr David McLeod of St Andrew’s RC Church, Edmonton. Msgr steenson met with them at the ordination of Fr Gibson at St John’s, Calgary.
      The Sodality of the Good Shepherd, Oshawa is administered by Jim Tilley and still active.
      The Tyendinaga group still exists but I don’t think Gerard Trinque is presently in formation.
      I am not sure what is happening in Nova Scotia with Dr Warner as Holy Cross website is presently closed down.
      I don’t know what is happening with the St Thomas More community in Prince Edward Island or with Chris Le Page. The same is true for the St Athanasius community in Montreal and their leader, Doug Nicholson.
      I understand that there are still quite a few former ACCC priests in formation and we should continue to see ordinations in future.

      • EPMS says:

        According to the ACCC website, St Athanasius is a functioning parish of that body, led by Douglas Nicholson.

      • CatholicLeft says:

        I know – but I am not sure how much to rely on the different websites these days.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        CatholicLeft,

        You wrote: The community in Hawaii is not now seeking entrance into the Ordinariate and their priest, Fr Wheeler, has posted that he is no longer seeking admission into the RC Church.

        That’s curious, as the community is no longer on the list of parishes of the Diocese of the West on the web site of the Anglican Church in America (ACA). Did that community affiliate with another “continuing Anglican” body?

        You wrote: I understand that there are still quite a few former ACCC priests in formation and we should continue to see ordinations in future.

        Yes, I believe that to be the case. IIRC, last fall, Msgr. Steenson said that there would be over twenty former Anglican clergy from Canada in the most recent formation class, and I’m aware of ordinations of only five or six of them. That March 2012 issue of the Diocesan Circular of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) listed a significant number of clergy who had no parishes attached as coming into the ordinariate, many of whom probably are included in this number. I also don’t recall hearing of Catholic ordinations of Kipling Cooper (formerly ACCC pastor of Holy Nativity, Barrhaven) and Doug Hayman (formerly ACCC pastor of St Barnabas, Spencerville), whose congregations are now part of the Sodality of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Ottawa. Deborah undoubtedly would have informed us of their Catholic ordinations!

        Norm.

      • CatholicLeft says:

        I don’t know where the community in Hawaii stands at this time. Fr wheeler is very angry with the treatment of Fr Kelley and St Mary’s, Hollywood by Nishops Strawn and Marsh, so his disaffiliation from ACA-DOW is no surprise.
        I have no idea if they are affiliated to another continuing group as I can find no evidence of it.

  10. Richard M says:

    Hello Deborah,

    Without question, communication remains a challenge for the North American Ordinariate. No newsletter, limited website and social media…well, no need to belabor it.

    But with the demise of the Anglo-Catholic it does seem like we’re struggling for an independent online presence…gathering place.

    I’d say the lack of comments is due to the fact that there aren’t many of us. But we’ve also seen how much commentary was generated at Anglo-Catholic…so perhaps it’s a means of finding the proper vehicle to renew that kind of activity.

    I would like to second Norm’s comment that systematic and accurate information on the status of current and incoming communities is hard to come by. The official Ordinariate site has been notoriously out of date,

  11. EPMS says:

    Regarding the supposed policy of the Catholic church to refrain from issuing press releases, Mrs Gyapong has in fact posted links to articles in various Catholic newspapers regarding the reception of groups in Vancouver, Edmonton, and elsewhere, the visit of Msgr Steenson to the group in Hamilton diocese, etc. Regarding the latter, although I think they were the first ACCC group to be received into the Catholic church, they were only officially received into the Ordinariate last month. That seems to be a separate process. That is presumably why the Edmonton, Oshawa, and Tyendinaga groups mentioned above do not appear on the Ordinariate website yet, though they were all received last year. The status of the last three is different. The last two ceased to be ACCC communities some time ago so it is uncertain whether there is any “group” involved. Dr Warner’s website, which fulfilled many of the goals talked about in this discussion, was taken down a few months ago without explanation.

  12. I am glad that this issue is creating a response and that some of us who are either in the Ordinariate, or, at least Ordinariate bound are coming out of the woodwork, so to speak. I really think there should be more communication between the various groups in Canada, so we can know what’s going on in various communities and be more supportive of one another. Right now, it just seems we are a string of isolated Anglican Use communities, hanging in a state of limbo. I am referring to those groups not yet received formally into the Ordinariate. One might get the impression from the above comments above that the Ordinariate experience is faltering in Canada. Well, it does have its problems, but we need to overcome these problems and become a little more pro-active in helping one another. The strength of this Canadian Deanery depends on this.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Paul,

      You wrote: I am glad that this issue is creating a response and that some of us who are either in the Ordinariate, or, at least Ordinariate bound are coming out of the woodwork, so to speak. I really think there should be more communication between the various groups in Canada, so we can know what’s going on in various communities and be more supportive of one another. Right now, it just seems we are a string of isolated Anglican Use communities, hanging in a state of limbo. I am referring to those groups not yet received formally into the Ordinariate. One might get the impression from the above comments above that the Ordinariate experience is faltering in Canada. Well, it does have its problems, but we need to overcome these problems and become a little more pro-active in helping one another. The strength of this Canadian Deanery depends on this.

      Yes, I concur completely!

      Norm.

  13. A Parishioner of St Agatha's says:

    Also, please let’s keep it international. It is a great encouragement to everyone to read about what is going on around the world and it is particularly heartening to read of successes elsewhere if and when there are problems in our own small corner.

    • EPMS says:

      The North American and UK Ordinariates seem to be very different communities. The latest Portal magazine makes reference to the fact that “in some areas, the Ordinariate has haemorrhaged members who become Diocesan Catholics.” This is not surprising in light of the fact that UK groups are worshipping, often only once a month, in diocesan churches, using the same NO liturgy they used as Anglicans. North American communities appear to have a greater sense of distinct identity.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote: The North American and UK Ordinariates seem to be very different communities. The latest Portal magazine makes reference to the fact that “in some areas, the Ordinariate has haemorrhaged members who become Diocesan Catholics.” This is not surprising in light of the fact that UK groups are worshipping, often only once a month, in diocesan churches, using the same NO liturgy they used as Anglicans. North American communities appear to have a greater sense of distinct identity.

        Yes, I think that this assessment is substantially correct. It’s likely that some of the smaller communities of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham will dissolve in due course unless another wave of incoming Anglicans greatly increases their numbers.

        But there is another phenomenon in the United Kingdom that we have not seen here in the States yet. English diocesan bishops have entrusted a few diocesan parishes with ordinariate communities attached to the pastoral care of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, one of which apparently was a previously a personal (non-territorial) parish serving primarily diplomatic personnel and thus has become a de facto ordinariate parish even though the diocese retains title to the real estate. It will be interesting to see how this development will play out over time.

        Norm.

  14. EPMS says:

    Norm: Are you talking about Precious Blood, Borough and Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory Gregory, Warwick Sq? Given the UK clergy shortage I would not be surprised if many more parishes are headed in future by clergy attached to the Ordinariate. The bigger issue is whether the number of Ordinariate lay people continues to justify Anglican Use services there.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You asked: Are you talking about Precious Blood, Borough and Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory Gregory, Warwick Sq?

      Yes, among others.

      There was a recent article on, or perhaps linked from, another blog about a small diocesan parish (or mission?) that previously did not have a resident pastor, but rather had one Sunday mass celebrated by the pastor of a parish in a neighboring town. The church now hosts two masses on a Sunday — one celebrated according to the ordinary form, ostensibly for the diocesan congregation, and the other currently celebrated according to Rite One of the Book of Divine Worship, ostensibly for an ordinariate congregation that moved there from a nearby town. The former Anglican pastor who came into the Catholic Church now resides in the rectory and serves as pastor for both congregations. The two congregations run many programmes, such as spiritual formation and sacramental preparation, jointly, pooling their resources.

      You wrote: Given the UK clergy shortage I would not be surprised if many more parishes are headed in future by clergy attached to the Ordinariate.

      Yes, we undoubtedly will see a lot more “arrangements of convenience” of this sort, probably in all three ordinariates.

      Of course, these arrangements are not all the same.

      Norm.

  15. EPMS says:

    The latest notices from St John the Evangelist, Calgary posted on the website invite the faithful to pray for eight Canadian candidates for the priesthood: seven former ACCC clergy and the man more widely known as Peregrinus. Given Fr Kenyon’s status as VF I think we can take this as an indication of who is currently in the pipeline.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      Ready to break open another bottle of champagne?

      You wrote: The latest notices from St John the Evangelist, Calgary posted on the website invite the faithful to pray for eight Canadian candidates for the priesthood: seven former ACCC clergy and the man more widely known as Peregrinus. Given Fr Kenyon’s status as VF I think we can take this as an indication of who is currently in the pipeline.

      Yes, clearly — and it also, by implication, gives us a good idea of where congregations are likely to soon join the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter and the Deanery of St. John the Baptist. The congregations that came with at least some of these clergy are in a “holding pattern” of temporary affiliation with the local diocese until the Catholic ordination of their former Anglican clergy.

      For the record, here’s the entry in the prayer requests in yesterday’s bulletin (boldface in original) to spare other readers of this blog the burden of looking up the notices on the parish’s web site.

      Those in formation for the Priesthood: Dr Colin O’Rourke, Dr David Skelton, Michael Shier, John Hodgins, James Tilley, Richard Harris, Douglas Hayman and Kipling Cooper.

      I’m sure that Deborah and the rest of the Sodality of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Ottawa is especially thrilled that the last two names are in this list!

      Norm.

  16. I’m a Catholic who is also webmaster for the Anglican Sojourners Fellowship (a ministry of the Anglican Network in Canada), and I’ve been looking for information on the Anglican Ordinariate in Canada in order to have resources available for any Anglicans who might be interested. I’m a great believer in the usefulness of websites for spreading information. I would like very much to be contacted by anyone who is involved with any kind of Anglican Ordinariate website (or would like to start one). You can email me at jeriwoods.dm(at)gmail.com.

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