My first post back at The Anglo-Catholic

Here’s a link and some excerpts.

Here I am with some of our parishioners during the Liturgy of the Word. Photo by Jake Wright.

MG 883132 1010x1024 Looking Back and Looking Ahead

When I left Kanata  Baptist Church, I left with the pastor’s blessing.  I told him I hungered for a more liturgical and sacramental form of worship but that I was thankful for all the good teaching and loving fellowship I had experienced there.

Had I not experienced the ten years of gradual growth in the Christian faith I might have experienced the spiritual bends on encountering the little Ottawa cathedral, but I was ready for its teachings about the male priesthood, about the Sacrifice of the Mass, and yes, its hopes of unity with the Catholic Church.  Had I come in there in 1990, I would have been appalled at the repetitive prayers, the unwillingness to even entertain the notion of women priests.

But I was ready for it.  Hungry for it.

Hearing then Bishop Robert Mercer pray the Mass gave me an intuitive grasp of Real Presence and being lifted to heaven in the liturgy.  I had such good catechesis there over the last ten years.    -snip-

So, just as I am still thankful for the Baptist Church, I am thankful for the Traditional Anglican Communion and the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada and the ministry I received there.  I wish those who have remained behind well.  I wish more of them had found they were able to join us.  Maybe some will in the future.

The other day, while helping a journalist-friend, I went back and took a look at theTraditional  Anglican Communion’s Portsmouth Petition of 2007.  What an inspiring document it still is.  I am proud of that letter.  I am also proud that two of the former ACCC bishops, Peter Wilkinson and now Fr. Robert Mercer, who accompanied Archbishop  John Hepworth to the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) with the letter signed by the TAC’s college of bishops, have humbly entered the Catholic Church with no conditions.  I am proud that my own former bishop, Carl Reid, has done the same and led his flock into the Catholic Church.  Other ACCC clergy across Canada will do the same and the decision to ask to come in was made with no guarantees any would be ordained as Catholic priests.

-snip-

I want to thank Archbishop John Hepworth because of how much he inspired me and how much he taught me.  I wish him all the best as he discerns his future and a reconciliation with the Catholic Church he loves that I trust will take place in time.

[Here’s a picture of our dear Archbishop Terrence Prendergast, also by Jake Wright.]

MG 886946 1024x686 Looking Back and Looking Ahead

-snip-

Just a few days before we were received, a Ukrainian Catholic priest said to me something along these lines:  “Stand up for yourselves,” he said.  “We have hundreds of years of experience with this.  Always continue to be yourselves.”

A friend from the Anglican Church of Canada, part of the Canterbury Communion, said he will be watching to see whether the Ordinariates truly do become a place where we can unpack the treasures of our Anglican patrimony as if we are truly at home.

I think we will.

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1 Response to My first post back at The Anglo-Catholic

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: So, just as I am still thankful for the Baptist Church, I am thankful for the Traditional Anglican Communion and the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada and the ministry I received there. I wish those who have remained behind well. I wish more of them had found they were able to join us. Maybe some will in the future.

    The numbers actually are far better than I expected. The listing on the second page of the March 2012 newsletter of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) shows 13 clerics and 6 essentially entact congregations committed to remain in the Diocese of Canada, 27 clerics and 9 essentially entact congregations in the Pro-Diocese of Our Lady of Walsingham to come into the Catholic Church in the initial wave, and 6 clerics and 3 congregations then remaining undecided, with 4 congregations splitting between the two choices. Basically, it appears that nearly two thirds of what was the ACCC last year be part of the Catholic Church by the end of this month or so.

    It would be interesting to do a survey as to the reasons why those remaining in the Diocese of Canada have opted to do so. Marital irregularities and impediments to Catholic ordination probably played a role, but some probably had misgivings about the process or the outcome, some clergy probably feel an obligation to sustain pastoral care for a parish that’s not ready or able to move and some parishonners probably decided to stay with a pastor or a congregation with which they have developed bonds.

    You wrote: A friend from the Anglican Church of Canada, part of the Canterbury Communion, said he will be watching to see whether the Ordinariates truly do become a place where we can unpack the treasures of our Anglican patrimony as if we are truly at home.

    Yes, I’m sure that a lot of people, like your friend, are skeptical about the outcome and thus have decided to take this “let’s wait and see” stance. Hopefully the adjustment to the Book of Divine Worship will be minor and your congregations will be back to “business as usual” by the end of June. The more significant detail, however, is that your friend seems to be expressing interest in what is happening — and I doubt that he is alone in this. Undoubtedly a significant number of this “wait and see” crowd will come around in due course.

    Norm.

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