Good news on the Ordinariate(s) front!

I’m cross-posting this from The Anglo-Catholic:

Here’s the list of communities in the Ordinariate from the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter website. The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter  lists our sodality in Ottawa among them!

*******

Anglicanorum coetibus, the Apostolic Constitution that created the Ordinariates for people of the Anglican Patrimony, envisions parishes, groups, and religious communities entering the Ordinariate.

Communities in the Ordinariate include the following:

Our Lady of Walsingham, Houston, TX
Mount Calvary, Baltimore, MD
Saint Luke’s, Bladensburg, MD
Saint Timothy, Fort Worth, TX
Saint Peter the Rock, Fort Worth, TX
Saint Michael the Archangel, Philadelphia, PA
St. Joseph of Aramathea, Indianapolis, IN
St. John’s, Calgary, Alberta
Sodality of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Ottawa, Ontario   [That’s us !!!!!!]
St. Anselm’s, Greenville, SC
St. Thomas More, Scranton, PA

+++++++++++++++++

And it’s also good to see this list of men being ordained for the Catholic priesthood in England, including at least a couple former TAC priests and!  the former Fr. John Hunwicke!!!!!!   Such good news from the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham website.

AISBITT  Osmond John
ALLDRITT  Nicholas Sebastian Fitzansculf
BENNIE  Stanley James Gordon
BERRY  Kenneth Percy John
BOUNDY  David
CANN  Christopher James
CORBYN  John Robert
COPUS  Brian George
GIBBONS  Paul James
GILL  Brian Alvan
GRIEVES  Ian Leslie
GIFFIN  Alan Howard Foster
GULL  William John
HUNWICKE  John William
MAUNDER  John David
MINCHEW  Donald Patrick
NARUSAWA  Masaki Alec
READER-MOORE  Anthony
STAFFORD  David George
WATTS  Franklin Charles
WESTON  Ivan John

 

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29 Responses to Good news on the Ordinariate(s) front!

  1. Paul Nicholls ofs says:

    Does this imply that St. John’s Calgary and the Oshawa Sodality have officially applied to join the Ordinariate and have been accepted? Are the rest of us to begin initiating this process of application as far as our Sodalities are concerned? Sorry, I am a little confused about what is going on. I think some clarification is needed.

  2. conchurl says:

    The OLW diaconal ordinations will be on Saturday 26th May at 10am in Westminster Cathedral.

  3. Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

    This is a bit confusing because the verb in the list is cast in the present tense. Are the Calgary (former Anglican Church of Canada, with many Anglican-Catholic members added) and Ottawa groups *already* in the Ordinariate? If so, what about the other former TAC parishes, especially the one in Victoria and the one in Oshawa?

    It is good to see the names of Hunwicke, Maunder and Gill on the list of ordinands. We already knew about the TAC applicants and it is good to see resolution for John Hunwicke.

    P.K.T.P.

    • Mr. Perkins, I’m sorry but I don’t know the answer to your question. I saw our name on the list so I guess we are members of the Ordinariate. I do not know why the others are not listed. Maybe I’ll have an answer to that soon and can convey some information here.

      • Don Henri says:

        Look at the wonderful new website for St Agatha Portsmouth! http://www.stagathas.net/
        + PAX et BONUM

      • Don Henri says:
      • Paul Nicholls ofs says:

        I have received word that at least one of the communities listed has not even put forth a formal request to join the Ordinariate. Under such circumstances, I don’t think the decision of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter to post such a list on their website has been a prudent, in light of this fact, and this will only sow confusion among those of us in other groups aspiring to join the Ordinariate. After all, there is supposed to be a process in place where a group sends forth its request to join the Ordinariate, the request is given consideration and then a decision is made by the Ordinary. Why are groups that have not even forwarded a request been listed as members of the Ordinariate?

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Paul,

        You asked: Why are groups that have not even forwarded a request been listed as members of the Ordinariate?

        I don’t know where you are getting the rumor that some groups did not make a request to join the ordinariate, but it’s likely that the inquiries submitted a year ago are being processed as requests for the groups that have progressed in that direction.

        Norm.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Peter,

      You asked: This is a bit confusing because the verb in the list is cast in the present tense. Are the Calgary (former Anglican Church of Canada, with many Anglican-Catholic members added) and Ottawa groups *already* in the Ordinariate? If so, what about the other former TAC parishes, especially the one in Victoria and the one in Oshawa?

      Yes, the list is of congregations that are now officially part of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter.

      Each of the ordinariate-bound congregations came into the Catholic Church as an “Anglican Use” congregation of the local diocese. There’s a major “paper shuffle” between the ordinariate and the respective diocese that must take place for the respective congregation to move from the diocese to the ordinariate — and the ordinatiate has an administrative staff of three people (the ordianary, the vicar general, and an administrative assistant) to process all of this paperwork. I’m sure that they are processing the paperwork as expeditiously as they can, but they have quite a backlog. Additionally, some dioceses undoubtedly will complete their part of the paperwork more quickly than others, depending how much backlog of other paperwork the administrative staff in the respective chanceries may have when the paperwork arrives from the ordinariates. Please be patient with the process. This is the first indication that any parishes are now officially part of the ordinariate. The list of member congregations on the ordinariate’s web site undoubtedly will grow as the paperwork gets completed. Bear in mind, also, that the webmaster probably will update the list once or twice a week, so it may lag the reality by a few days.

      You wrote: It is good to see the names of Hunwicke, Maunder and Gill on the list of ordinands. We already knew about the TAC applicants and it is good to see resolution for John Hunwicke.

      Yes, I agree!

      Norm.

  4. Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

    Only nine communities from the U.S.A. in the Ordinariate there? That’s not many but I’m assuming that this is only a preliminary list and that many more are to join it.

    P.K.T.P.

    • conchurl says:

      There are several more established communities to come. Indeed new exploratory groups are starting to form in different areas.

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        Well, if the cowboys down there don’t move a bit faster, they may have to join the Ordinariate of our Lady of the Maple Leaf. We’d be happy to have them but they’d have to abandon their stetsons and wear red tunics. Which reminds me that we are having celebrations next month across the Dominion for our victory over the Americans in the War of 1812. It’s the 200th anniversary of the defeat of the forces of darkness down there. Anyway, if the Americans get going soon, we’d be happy to create a Deanery for the U.S.A., run out of Toronto.

      • conchurl says:

        Not exactly sure why that gentle ribbing is directed at me. I’m not a Yank, I’m Irish.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Peter,

        You wrote: Dominion for our victory over the Americans in the War of 1812. It’s the 200th anniversary of the defeat of the forces of darkness down there.

        The so-called “War of 1812” (another misnomer of history…) actually began in December of that year. Nearly all of the actual fighting occurred in 1813 and 1814.

        Norm.

  5. Toronto AU Catholic says:

    Some of us in the Toronto Anglican Use Sodality are also a little confused too by this list! I suspect (without absolutely no insight yet from Msgr Steenson or Fr Hurd) that this is a list of groups intending to join (and some who by their conduct are obviously meaning to join), but perhaps some are further along in the application process than others. I believe that, canonically, there does have to be some form of agreement or formal acknowledgement between the Diocese the group is leaving and the Ordinariate. All will become clear in due time.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Toronto AU Catholic,

      You wrote: Some of us in the Toronto Anglican Use Sodality are also a little confused too by this list! I suspect (without absolutely no insight yet from Msgr Steenson or Fr Hurd) that this is a list of groups intending to join (and some who by their conduct are obviously meaning to join), but perhaps some are further along in the application process than others.

      Yes, there’s no doubt that “some are further along… than others.” But the list is undoubtedly a list of parishes and other communities that are now subject to Msgr. Steenson rather than to the local diocesan bishop.

      You wrote: I believe that, canonically, there does have to be some form of agreement or formal acknowledgement between the Diocese the group is leaving and the Ordinariate.

      Note the following from my previous reply to Peter (above).

      Each of the ordinariate-bound congregations came into the Catholic Church as an “Anglican Use” congregation of the local diocese. There’s a major “paper shuffle” between the ordinariate and the respective diocese that must take place for the respective congregation to move from the diocese to the ordinariate — and the ordinatiate has an administrative staff of three people (the ordianary, the vicar general, and an administrative assistant) to process all of this paperwork. I’m sure that they are processing the paperwork as expeditiously as they can, but they have quite a backlog. Additionally, some dioceses undoubtedly will complete their part of the paperwork more quickly than others, depending how much backlog of other paperwork the administrative staff in the respective chanceries may have when the paperwork arrives from the ordinariates. Please be patient with the process.

      But it’s actually even more complicated than that. While each congregation remains under the governance of the local diocesan bishop, the local diocesan bishop bears responsibility to assign clergy from his diocese, or to make other arrangements, to provide sacramental ministry for the community. When a congregation moves to the ordinariate, that responsibility transfers to the ordinary — and right now, the ordinariate simply does not have enough clergy to supply clergy to each of the congregations. This means that the ordinariate must enter into an agreement with either the bishop of the diocese or the major superior of a religious order for the diocese or the order to supply sacramental ministry for the congregation before it can move. It does take time to work out the details of these agreements.

      Additionally, several of the parishes on the list are in unique situations.

      >> The parish of Our Lady of Walsingham in Houston is the principal church of the ordinariate. Its most recent pastor officially retired as of 30 April, but probably has agreed to continue to assist in providing liturgical services when the ordinary is out of town until its new pastor takes over on 01 July.

      >> The priest delegated as chaplain for St. Luke’s Parish in Bladensburg, Maryland, is now the vicar general of the ordinariate, so there was no need to enter an agreement for that parish.

      >> The pastor of St. Thomas More Parish in Scranton, Pennsylvania, was excardinated from the Diocese of Scranton and incardinated into the ordinariate concurrent with the canonical transfer of the parish.

      >> The Archbishop of Ottawa had delegated a member of a religious order to supply sacramental ministry for the Sodality of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in that city. It probably was quite easy to transfer the existing agreement between the order and the archdiocese to the ordinariate along with the parish (or to put together a substantially idential agreement between the order and the ordinariate, to take effect upon the canonical transfer).

      >> The Society of St. Joseph of Arimathea in Indianapolis, Indiana, apparently is attending a mass celebrated according to the ordinary form of the Roman Missal at a local parish pending the Catholic ordination of their administrator, Luke Reese. If the members of that community are satisfied with that interim arrangement, there might not have been a need to enter an agreement.

      I don’t know the situation surrounding the other congregations on this list, but several of them do appear to be among the larger ordinariate-bound congregations. It does make sense that the ordinariate’s administrative staff might have started with the larger communities, as they affect the most potential members.

      It’s also quite likely that some of the diocesan bishops have “suggested” that it would be easier to transfer the parishes in their dioceses upon the Catholic ordination of their administrators, who will become their pastors, as this would eliminate the need for a formal agreement between the ordinary and the respective diocesan bishop. If that’s the manner in which the diocesan bishop prefers to proceed, the ordinary really does not have much practical choice: there no canonical mechanism to force the diocesan bishop to do otherwise, and there’s also nothing to gain by alienating the diocesan bishop. Thus, it’s very likely that many of the congregations destined for the ordinariate will make the transition next month and that others will make the transition when the second group of ordinariate-bound clergy complete the first phase of formation, probably in the fall.

      You wrote: All will become clear in due time.

      I doubt that any of the administrative minutiae will ever gain much publicity. Nonetheless, the fact that some congregations now have completed the transfer into the ordinariate is further evidence that the process is moving forward. This list undoubtedly will grow as the small administrative staff of the ordinariates and the respective dioceses complete the “paper shuffle” to effect the canonical transfer of the remaining congregations.

      But what most assuredly will happen “in due time” is that all of the remaining “ordinariate-bound” congregations will complete the canonical transfer from the respective dioceses to the ordinariate.

      Norm.

      • Paul Nicholls ofs says:

        Let’s be clear about something. None of the Canadian groups, including the Sodality in Ottawa have submitted any paper work or made any formal request to join the Ordinariate as of today. I know this for a fact. So, why any Canadian Sodality or parish is being listed as a member of the Ordinariate is beyond me. The cart has been placed way ahead of the horse on this issue and I question why the Office of the Ordinariate would jump the gun like this. I have decided not to make any more comments about this. I am rather annoyed by the whole issue, especially in light of the fact that a number of the other Canadian Sodalities have been left out of the loop. I think others should be annoyed, too, and explanation from the Ordinary would help.

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        One of the advantages of the two-step process is that A.U. communities can, first of all, enter into good relations with the local bishop. The local bishop is also in a position to provide an initial chaplain from among his clergy and a sacred place of worship. Once the community passes into the ordinariate, it can continue to use that sacred place until it can afford it own (if ever) by the joint agreement of Ordinary and Bishop. Similarly, in small communities, the diocesan chaplain might to continue in his rôle with the same joint agreement.

        I realise Paul Nicholls’s concerns but I don’t think that we should worry overmuch about it. I’m guessing that a number of Canadian communities will enter the Ordinariate by autumn, which is not that far away. Have a happy summer!

        P.K.T.P.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Paul,

        You wrote: None of the Canadian groups, including the Sodality in Ottawa have submitted any paper work or made any formal request to join the Ordinariate as of today.

        Really?

        Didn’t they all submit an application to join a Canadian ordinariate to Cardinal Collins over a year ago?

        Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        Norm: In an entirely charitable spirit I encourage you to resist pontificating on the War of 1812. It can only end badly for you.

  6. Toronto AU Catholic says:

    Sorry, my first parenthetical with the double negative should have been “with absolutely no insight yet…”

  7. Mourad says:

    And a small piece of further good news – it is announced this morning on the web site of the Australian Bishops Conference that the Australian Ordinariate is to be erected on 15th June!

  8. Don Henri says:

    Australian ordinariate to be erecte on 15 juin 2012! http://www.catholic.org.au/

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Don,

      You wrote: Australian ordinariate to be erecte on 15 juin 2012!

      That’s fantastic news! Thank you for breaking it!

      Norm.

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        Yes, this news could hardly be better. It also bodes well for an eventual Canadian ordinariate. I count only seventeen TAC priests in Australia and perhaps not all of them are coming over. Of course, there may be other incomers from Canterburian Anglican Church of Australia. Still, this is likely a smaller crossing than the one in Canada.

        I’m guessing that the incomers will include the small TAC group in Japan, alwasy overseen from Australia. It remains to be seen if the Torres Strait group will also be included.

        A bottle of Dom Perignon for the lot of you!

        P.K.T.P.

      • Don Henri says:

        Dr. Perkins: Apparently virtually all of Forward in Faith Australia (part of the Canterbury Church) will join the ordinariate. That’s not a problem because TAC Bishops (particularly + Chislett & Robarts) have for a long time overseen those Canterbury communities, deprived of Bishops sharing their concerns in their own Church.

      • conchurl says:

        David Chislett resigned from TAC in 2010 and returned to the Anglican Church of Australia.

  9. Pingback: Good news on the Ordinariate(s) front! | Catholic Canada

  10. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    There’s more good news. The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter just published a schedule of ordinations to the deaconate and the presbyterate. It includes several candidates coming from the Traditional Anglican Communion (Patrimony of the Primate, formerly of the Anglican Church in America). The schedule also shows the planned receptions of a couple communities into the ordinariate (Christ the King Church, Towson, Maryland, on 24 June and the Orange County Ordinariate Group in California on 03 July).

    I’m sorry to say that there are no Canadian ordinations on the list, but this is consistent with your report a couple months ago that the clergy coming from the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) had not begun the program of formation for Catholic ordination. Nonetheless, I hope you will find encouragement in the fact that the process is moving forward. I hope to see all of the former clergy of the ACCC on the next schedule!

    Norm.

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