Such good news from Australia

On Friday, the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Holy Father established the Personal Ordinariate of the Southern Cross and made former Traditional Anglican Communion  (TAC) Bishop Harry Entwistle, who was ordained a Catholic priest yesterday, the Ordinary.

This sends such a positive message, finally, to the TAC as many (me included) have felt like we were treated like we were unwanted at the Ordinariate banqueting-table and likely to scare away the wanted guests from the Canterbury Communion.

So now we have a former Church of England Bishop as Ordinary in England and Wales (Msgr. Keith Newton) and a former Episcopal Church Bishop as Ordinary in the United States and soon of a Canadian Deanery and a former Traditional Anglican Communion Bishop in Australia.

Sadly, the positive message may be too late for the TAC, which has for the most part abandoned hopes of unity with the Catholic Church and said no thanks to Anglicanorum coetibus.

But there may still be Anglicans in other countries hoping for Ordinariates there.  We hope some day to have our own in Canada eventually.

Here are some excerpts of a story from the Catholic News Agency,  my emphases.

Father Harry Entwistle and Pope Benedict XVI.

Melbourne, Australia, Jun 15, 2012 / 04:22 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- On June 15 Pope Benedict officially erected the Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross for Anglican groups and individuals who want to enter full communion with the Catholic Church.

-snip-

The decree establishing the new ordinariate came from the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

“The supreme law of the Church is the salvation of souls,” the decree said. “As such, throughout history, the Church has always found the pastoral and juridical means to care for the good of the faithful.”

Fr. Entwistle said that membership is open to former Anglicans who accept what the Catholic Church believes and teachers, as well as to former Anglicans who have previously joined the Catholic Church. Those who have close family members in the ordinariate may also join.

The Pope has also created ordinariates in England and Wales and the U.S. Their leaders welcomed the Australian ordinariate.

-snip-

Fr. Entwistle was born in Lancashire in England on May 31, 1940.

He studied at the University of Durham and was ordained for the Anglican Diocese of Blackburn in 1964. He emigrated to Australia in 1988. He has served as a parish priest and a prison chaplain.

In 2006 he joined the Anglican Catholic Church in Australia, which is part of the Traditional Anglican Communion. He was ordained a bishop for that church body in November 2006.

He married Jean Barrett Bolts in 1967 and has a married son and a single daughter.

Fr. Entwistle said Pope Benedict has made it “very clear” that Christian unity is not  achieved by agreeing on “the lowest common denominator.” Those who join an ordinariate “accept the Catechism of the Catholic Church as the authoritative expression of the Catholic faith,” he said.

Tags: Pope BenedictOrdinariate

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1 Response to Such good news from Australia

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: This sends such a positive message, finally, to the TAC as many (me included) have felt like we were treated like we were unwanted at the Ordinariate banqueting-table and likely to scare away the wanted guests from the Canterbury Communion….

    Sadly, the positive message may be too late for the TAC, which has for the most part abandoned hopes of unity with the Catholic Church and said no thanks to Anglicanorum coetibus.

    Well, yes and no. The episcopal leadership that has seized control of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) obviously is considerably less pro-communion than those who are coming into the three ordinariates that now exist, but they cannot stop individuals or families who currently belong to their parishes from leaving. The people who remain with the TAC clearly consist of four groups: (1) those who will follow their bishops and pastors regardless of what their bishops and pastors do, (2) those who are ardently anti-Catholic or who have unresolvable impediments to full communion or Catholic ordination, who won’t ever come into full communion, (3) those who have misgivings about Anglicanorum coetibus or the process and thus are taking a “wait and see” attitude, many of whom will come into an ordinariate when they see the result of the process, and (4) those who would come into the Catholic Church to form ordinariates if that becomes an option in their countries. We can only pray that most of the laity who still belong to The Traditional Anglican Church (TTAC), the Anglican Church in America (ACA), the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC), and the Anglican Catholic Church in Australia (ACCA) are in the third of these groups.

    BTW, it seems likely that Pope Benedict XVI will name Fr. Entwistle as an Apostolic Protonotary in a couple months — probably just before the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross begins the formal process of receiving parish communities into full communion and ordaining clergy. I have not seen a timeline for this process as yet.

    You wrote: So now we have a former Church of England Bishop as Ordinary in England and Wales (Msgr. Keith Newton) and a former Episcopal Church Bishop as Ordinary in the United States and soon of a Canadian Deanery and a former Traditional Anglican Communion Bishop in Australia.

    Don’t forget that each “deanery” will have a “dean” who will oversee it on behalf of the ordinary. The dean will be a presbyter who will have substantially the same authority as a vicar general within the deanery. The canonical erection of the Canadian deanery probably will occur upon the ordination as a Catholic presbyter of its first dean. The real difference is that the dean officially reports to the ordinary rather than to the Vatican.

    Note, also, that the Canadian deanery is clearly intended to be a transitional structure that will become a separate ordiariate as soon as circumstances permit. A second wave of Canadian parishes asking to join the ordinariate certainly would help to expedite the process, but it probably won’t happen until the Canadian deanery is fully functional.

    You wrote: But there may still be Anglicans in other countries hoping for Ordinariates there.

    This may well happen much more quickly than you might expect, especially if the rift between the Global Anglican Futures Conference (GAFCON) and the radical provinces of the Anglican Communion turns into a full-blown schism. Such a scenario probably would open the door for the Anglican provinces of GAFCON to come into full communion with Rome, and the ordinariate structure probably would be the most feasible mechanism for that to happen.

    Norm.

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