Another Anglican Use parish to enter the American Ordinariate

St. Mary Parish in Arlington, Texas to Become Part of New Ordinariate

Parish started as an Episcopal Parish; Became Catholic in 1994

 

St. Mary the Virgin Catholic Parish in Arlington, Texas, currently part of the Diocese of Fort Worth, will become part of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter within the next few months, the pastor announced at Masses today.

 

St. Mary’s, which has 400 members, was founded as an Episcopal church, but became part of the Catholic diocese in 1994 under the “Pastoral Provision” which granted limited approval for Episcopal parishes to become Catholic and married Episcopal clergy to be ordained as Catholic priests. St. Mary’s was one of a handful of parishes to enter the Catholic Church under this option.

 

On January 1, 2012, in response to repeated requests from Anglican clergy and groups seeking to become Catholic, Pope Benedict XVI broadened the opportunity for them to do so by creating the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. The ordinariate is equivalent to a diocese, though national in scope. Its communities, while fully Catholic, retain elements of their Anglican heritage and traditions, particularly in the liturgy.

 

Since January, nearly 20 former Anglican parishes or communities have joined the ordinariate, and 22 former Anglican or Episcopal priests across the United States and Canada been ordained Catholic priests. Six of these priests were ordained by Fort Worth Bishop Kevin Vann in June.

 

The parish’s transition to the ordinariate has the full support of Bishop Vann, who has been instrumental in the formation of the ordinariate and who oversees the pastoral provision for the Catholic Church in the United States.

 

Reverend Allan Hawkins, the long-time pastor of St. Mary, shared with parishioners a letter from the head of the ordinariate, Monsignor Jeffrey N. Steenson, which said in part, “I am very pleased that, thanks to the steady and wise leadership of Bishop Vann and Fr. Hawkins, you have come to the threshold of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. We rejoice that you will soon become part of the Ordinariate, the culmination of the journey commenced in 1994 when your parish was received into the Catholic Church under the Anglican Use.”

 

Fr. Hawkins has led the parish for 32 years; the transition will occur upon his retirement. St. Mary the Virgin was established in 1961 as St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal mission church, and became a full parish in 1969. In 1986, under the direction of Fr. Hawkins, the parish was renamed St. Mary the Virgin. In 1994, it became the first Episcopal parish in the United States to transfer corporately into the Catholic Church, and to retain its property in the transition. That same year, Fr. Hawkins was ordained a Catholic priest.

 

The Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter is based in Houston, Texas. Its principal church is Our Lady of Walsingham, a former pastoral provision parish in Houston. Ordinariate communities are located across the United States and Canada, including Florida, where 140 parishioners at the former Anglican Cathedral of the Incarnation in Orlando, Florida, were received into the Catholic Church today as part of the ordinariate.

 

Online:

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Another Anglican Use parish to enter the American Ordinariate

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    The article states: Fr. Hawkins has led the parish for 32 years; the transition will occur upon his retirement.

    This sentence is very interesting, indeed! Reading between the lines, this seems to imply that Fr. Hawkins canonically will remain a presbyter of the Diocese of Fort Worth in retirement, though he certainly may continue to assist the parish in his retirement. Msgr. Steenson probably will appoint one of the former Episcopal priests whom Bishop Vann recently ordained for the ordinariate as the new pastor of the parish.

    Norm.

    • Henri says:

      It has already been done: fr joshua whitfield one of the “fort worth 6” was appointed as curate there after beeing ordained and will probably become the new rector.
      It seems that the forerunners of the pp are like moses: able to see the promised land but not to enter it.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Henri,

        You wrote: It has already been done: fr joshua whitfield one of the “fort worth 6″ was appointed as curate there after beeing ordained and will probably become the new rector.

        Thank you for filling in that detail.

        BTW, since the adoption of the present Codex Juris Canonici (Code of Canon Law), the presbyters who assist the pastor of a parish are “parochial vicars” answerable directly to the diocesan bishop or equivalent individual (the ordinary in the case of an ordinariate) rather than “curates” answerable to the pastor. Of course, this is without prejudice to the pastor’s canonical authority over all matters pertaining to the administration and ministries of the parish.

        You wrote: It seems that the forerunners of the pp are like moses: able to see the promised land but not to enter it.

        It’s pretty clear that the ordinariate probably does not have resources to provide a pension and benefits for a retiring cleric right now, whereas the diocese does. Thus, this arrangement is a matter of practical necessity.

        But realistically, the canonical details of the arrangement are not particularly important. The apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus” and the associated “Complementary Norms” make ample provision for collaboration between diocesan clergy and clergy of an ordinariate in their respective ministries. The retiring pastor undoubtedly will be welcome to concelebrate parish masses on days when he does not have masses elsewhere and will be invited to fill in to provide sacramental ministry when the pastor is away, so long as his health allows him to do so, after the parish makes the canonical transition.

        It’s also instructive here to note that the pastor of St. Thomas More Parish in Scranton moved to the ordinariate through the excardination and incardination process when that parish moved from the local diocese to the ordinariate. He probably is not nearing retirement, though.

        Norm.

  2. Pingback: Another Anglican Use parish to enter the American Ordinariate | Catholic Canada

  3. Joshua says:

    Dear Deborah,

    Could you, as the good journalist (or journo, as we say in Australia) that you are, detail how many Pastoral Provision parishes have joined / are joining the Ordinariate, and how many are not? Famously, Our Lady of the Atonement is not – but is that parish the only exception?

    • Henri says:

      3 have joined: our lady of walsingham, St. Thomas more, & nows st Mary the Virgin. St athansius and our lady of the atonement declined to join, and i don’t know about St. Anselm of canterbury and our lady of hope. The all saints sister are of the anglican use but as far as i know intend to remain in the diocèse of Baltimore.
      It seems that only those congregations that are financially self-supporting are making thé leap.

  4. wayfarer says:

    If you think about it, it isn’t surprising that many of the pastoral provision parishes aren’t immediately joining the Ordinariate. The parishes as they stand are part of established dioceses that can insure that salaries are paid, they have insurance plans, retirement benefits for their priests, Catholic schools where they can send their kids, and they are much more stable at this point. It is likely that the pastoral provision diocesan priests are involved in their dioceses, may be on various committees and have diocesan obligations just like all other diocesan clergy. It may simply be that given the stability of their current situation within their dioceses, they are either waiting until the Ordinariate can provide a similar amount of stability, or they are simply happy where they are and don’t want to move. It isn’t a “given” that all pastoral provision parishes would actually want to make the move.

  5. BCCatholic says:

    Why does the list at the POCSP website show the Calgary parish of St John the Evangelist and the Sodality in Ottawa as the only Canadian members of the Ordinariate? The Sodality of St Edmund has been around since January 1, I believe, and there are groups in Oshawa, Toronto, Edmonton, and Victoria as well. Is the US listing equally out of date?

    • Rev22:17 says:

      BCCatholic,

      You asked: Why does the list at the POCSP website show the Calgary parish of St John the Evangelist and the Sodality in Ottawa as the only Canadian members of the Ordinariate? The Sodality of St Edmund has been around since January 1, I believe, and there are groups in Oshawa, Toronto, Edmonton, and Victoria as well. Is the US listing equally out of date?

      All of these groups do indeed exist, but they probably are not officially part of the ordinariate yet. Rather, they probably are temporarily part of the respective local (arch)diocese, which must provide for their sacramental ministry until the Catholic ordination of their former Anglican clergy. They undoubtedly will move to the ordinariate upon the Catholic ordination of their former Anglican clergy.

      Note that the Parish of St. John the Evangelist and the Sodality of Our Lady of the Annunciation in Ottawa are in different situations.

      >> The Parish of St. John the Evangelist already has its first canonical pastor (Fr. Lee Kenyon, who received Catholic ordination last June).

      >> The sacramental ministry for the Sodality of Our Lady of the Annunciation is in the hands of a pontifical religious order rather than the local diocese, obviously until the Catholic ordination of its former Anglican clergy. Clergy of a pontifical religious order relate to the ordinariate in the same manner as to a diocese, whereas diocesan clergy do not.

      Thus, these congregations have already moved to the ordinariate. I think that the Sodality of Our Lady of the Annunciation was the only Canadian group actually received into the ordinariate rather than the local (arch)diocese.

      Norm.

      • Paul Nicholls ofs says:

        Due to the irregularity of providing a regular Anglican Use Mass on Sundays, I have withdrawn from the Sodality of the Good Shepherd. I have returned to a regular RC parish where there is a provision for EF masses to be celebrated on Sunday. I am also no longer submitting comment on the Sodality’s Blog or website.

        To me, the whole process has been less than successful in Oshawa.

        I will consider returning in a year’s time, provided mass will be celebrated every Sunday (hopefully, by former ACCC clergy who have been ordained as Catholic priests) and provided there is an Ordinariate community in Oshawa. If not, I will stay where I am.

        I have discerned that this is not the time for me to be involved with the Ordinariate process and this may very well be my last comment on this blog, or any other. I wish all concerned the very best in what has proved to be a very trying time for certain communities.

        If all the communities had have fared as well as Annunciation in Ottawa or St. John’s,Calgary the transition may have been a lot smoother and less stressful and I
        may have still been involved.

  6. BCCatholic says:

    Who is ministering to the St Joseph of Arimathea people in Indianapolis?

  7. BCCatholic says:

    So the sacramental ministry is being undertaken by diocesan clergy? This also seems to be the case in Rochester, which would undermine Norm’s otherwise plausible explanation for the exclusion of the other Canadian communities.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      BCCatholic,

      You wrote: So the sacramental ministry is being undertaken by diocesan clergy? This also seems to be the case in Rochester….

      Maybe or maybe not. The Society of St. Joseph seems to be attending regular parish masses celebrated according to the ordinary form of the Roman Rite for now, rather than having separate masses of their own. This may also be true of the community in Rochester.

      You wrote: … which would undermine Norm’s otherwise plausible explanation for the exclusion of the other Canadian communities.

      Not necessarily. In a different country, the matter is subject to a different set of policies promulgated by a different conference of bishops (or liaison committee) under a different apostolic delegate. This is also a matter where there is considerable freedom for the ordinariate to work out whatever arrangement seems most expedient in each case, consistent with the norms established by the respective conference of bishops (or its liaison committee) and the respective apostolic delegate.

      Norm.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s