Why the gloves in the Traditional Latin Mass?

Why does the celebrant in a Traditional Latin Mass wear gloves?   Do only bishops wear gloves or do priests wear them?   And is it true they wear silk drawers in the liturgical colors?  And buskins?  Or have some of these traditions gone by the wayside.

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8 Responses to Why the gloves in the Traditional Latin Mass?

  1. Pingback: Why the gloves in the Traditional Latin Mass? | Catholic Canada

  2. Fr. David Marriott says:

    You can find some elucidation about this topic by consulting Monsignor Mercer, who, when still an Anglican Bishop, was the celebrant at Mass at St. Agatha’s Portsmouth, during which I was fascinated by the servers putting on and taking off gloves, even (attempting) to kiss the celebrant’s hand at one time (Bishop Mercer told me he usually hid his under his chasuble.) But it is interesting that in the Anglican tradition, it seems that the server and acolytes wear the gloves, not the celebrant.
    I see from the ‘Mystery Worshipper’ site that this habit is not confined to the UK, as it was seen in Sydney – Christ Church St. Laurence – where the visitor recorded this as the one thing they will remember in seven days’ time…
    (http://www.ship-of-fools.com/mystery/2001/280Mystery.html)

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Fr. David,

      You wrote: But it is interesting that in the Anglican tradition, it seems that the server and acolytes wear the gloves, not the celebrant.

      This is probably for the same purpose as “pims” in full pontifical celebrations of the Roman Rite, where two servers known as “pimmers” hold the principal celebrant’s miter and crosier when the principal celebrant is not actually wearing/holding them. The “pim” is long white or off-white shawl a couple feet wide, similar to a hummeral veil but without a clasp, worn over the alb. It wraps over both shoulders of the wearer and hangs nearly to the floor. The “pimmer” holds the miter or crosier through the “pim” so as not to smudge them with skin oil, sweat, or whatever else might be on the “pimmer’s” hands.

      Norm.

      • Tim S. says:

        Norm, don’t you mean “vimpa” or “vimp?” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vimpa
        I couldn’t find a defintion for pim or pimmer.

      • Victor says:

        In Germany, they usually wear white gloves instead of “pims”.

      • Fr. James Schovanek says:

        When I was a Benedictine, the ‘shawls’ we used to carry the abbot’s crosier and mitre were called ‘vimpae’ (sing. ‘vimpa’) see Wikipedia art. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vimpa].

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Tim,

        You asked: Norm, don’t you mean “vimpa” or “vimp?”

        Yes, apparently. I had only heard (or apparently misheard…) the term years ago, in a situation in which there was more than a little background noise, and had not seen it written.

        Thanks to you and the others for the correction.

        Norm.

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