Filling the information vacuum

Catholic Left has assembled some unofficial lists of Ordinariate of St. Peter (COSP) clergy, parishes or groups, and those parishes and groups that had been expected to come in to the Ordinariate but have not.

The parish list does not include former Canon Richard Harris’ group from Fredericton, New Brunswick, the latest addition to the  Canadian Deanery of the COSP Ordinariate.

Seems most of the latest news is happening on Facebook.

It would be good at some point to have top-of-the-line official communications sources for the Ordinariates.   It seems right now there isn’t the manpower available or perhaps this is deemed a low priority item 

 

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Filling the information vacuum

  1. Richard M says:

    Thanks for linking these, Deborah – these are the closest I’ve seen to complete lists on who’s in, and who’s not yet, and how.

  2. Paul Nicholls ofs says:

    I think it’s about time that something be done about this communications problem by the Dean (here in Canada) or the Ordinary. Often I receive conflicting information from various sources and it’s hard to know who to believe. The Ordinariate website is where such information should be posted and not on Facebook pages and blogs. If the information is not coming from official sources, one may question its credibility or accuracy. I think it’s time that the powers that be started pulling things together. By the way, this is not only my personal opinion, but that of a number of people I talk to on a regular basis. My own continued participation in this Ordinariate will largely depend on what transpires in the next 6 months or so. From what I have been told privately from one official source, I can see that there are a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Personally, I think the natives are getting a little restless about the whole matter, but few are willing to voice their opinions.

    • EPMS says:

      Ideally there should be an official source of accurate, up to date Ordinariate news, to assist reporters and commentators and to ensure that the faithful are fully in the loop. And there should also be group/parish websites to provide practical up to date information about services and special events, and blogs and Facebook pages to give a human face to the Ordinariate and assist in marketing and team-building. Each information source has its function; none should be forced to undertake all these diverse communication tasks. The current mish-mash is the worst of all possible worlds, as Mr Nicholls points out.

  3. Pingback: Filling the information vacuum | Catholic Canada

  4. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: Catholic Left has assembled some unofficial lists of Ordinariate of St. Peter (COSP) clergy, parishes or groups, and those parishes and groups that had been expected to come in to the Ordinariate but have not.

    As much as I am suspicious of the orthodoxy of any organization that calls itself “Catholic Left” and thus loathe the thought of going to its web site, there is some significant information in your links. Great find!

    But having said that, there are a few mysteries.

    >> 1. In the discussion of the All Saints Sisters of the Poor community in Catonsville, Maryland, now a diocesan order of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, there’s a mention of St. Timothy’s Church in the same community. The Baltimore Sun reported that an Episcopal parish by that name had voted to leave The Episcopal Church and join the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. The article also states that about fifteen members had decided to continue as the Episcopal parish, and that there would be a continuing service for them at 9:00 AM and a second service for those moving to the ordinariate at 10:30 AM on Sundays. There’s a new web site for Saint Timothy’s Episcopal Church, the “history” page of which contains this paragraph.

    The congregation of St. Timothy’s Church moved out of our old church and as of July 7th is worshipping in the old stone chapel at St. Mark’s just two blocks away on Melvin Avenue.

    This indicates that the ordinariate-bound congregation probably arranged to retain use of the facilities — and I doubt that the continuing Episcopal congregation, with only about fifteen members, could afford to maintain those facilities in any case. There’s also picture of Msgr. Steenson with the ordinariate’s “newest and oldest” member, posted on 31 March 2013, with a note that he received her into the ordinariate at St. Timothy’s Church in Catonsville — but no mention of the rest of the parish (!) — and an item about Fr. Scott Hurd “visit[ing] a new ordinariate community” at that church on 09 June 2013. But, again, there’s no official word and no listing of a community in Catonsville, Maryland, on the ordinariate’s web site. The parish also does not appear on the list of “Other Churches in the Archdiocese,” which does include other parishes of the ordinariate.

    So what’s happening with the former clergy and parishioners of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church?

    >> 2. The following entry appears in the list of prospective parishes.

    St Peter Damien Parish, Indianapolis.

    This was somehow connected to Fr Luke Reece of St Joseph of Arimathea Society, Indiana, now a Catholic Priest in the Ordinariate.

    The web site of the Society of St. Joseph or Arimathea now has no mention of the group’s former Anglican pastor and the information page says that the new administrator of Holy Rosary Parish, which hosts this group, will be celebrating mass according to the “Anglican Use” for this group, in addition to celebrating according to both the ordinary form and the Tridentine form for the parish. I also had the impression that the former pastor was on track for Catholic ordination for the service of the ordinariate, but I have not seen anything about his ordinations — and he also does not appear on the list of ordinariate clergy on the Catholic Left web site.

    So what’s happening with (Fr.) Luke Reece?

    >> 3. The following excerpt from the listing of ordinariate communities is insightful.

    The [Fort Worth Area Ordinariate Group] entered the Church as the St Peter the Rock Ordinariate Catholic Community…
    Fr Perkins was ordained as an Ordinariate priest on June 30th, 2012, having been received with his 30+ strong community in September 2011. All former members of TEC.
    Fr Perkins, as of April 1st of 2013, is the pastor of St Mary the Virgin parish, Arlington (see below) and, with the two groups being close together they have pretty much been united at St Mary’s, with some services still continuing in the former chapel used by St Peter’s.

    The merger of nearby ordinariate communities makes absolute sense — but, curiously, St. Mary the Virgin no longer appears on the listing of communities on the ordinariate’s web site and there being no link to a web site for the St. Peter the Rock community, yet there’s a link to St. Mary the Virgin on the listing on the web site of the Anglican Use Society. (Here, I’ll remark that the Anglican Use Society also has the correct link for the newly received Saint Gregory the Great community in Beverly, Massachusetts, and that the ordinariate’s web site does not.)

    The connection of this apparently de facto merger of communities with the retirement of the pastor of St. Mary the Virgin is also interesting, especially in light of the recent discussion of congregations erected under the pastoral provision not moving into the ordinariate immediately. Moving into the ordinariate when their current pastors retire may well become the de facto norm.

    You wrote: The parish list does not include former Canon Richard Harris’ group from Fredericton, New Brunswick, the latest addition to the Canadian Deanery of the COSP Ordinariate.

    Hmmm….

    I’m not sure what’s happening, but this congregation does not yet appear on the list of communities of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. IIRC, we got news of this congregation’s reception into the Catholic Church a couple weeks ago. I don’t know whether it’s taking a LOT longer to update the ordinariate’s web site than in the past or whether perhaps this congregation is temporarily part of the local diocese.

    You wrote: It would be good at some point to have top-of-the-line official communications sources for the Ordinariates. It seems right now there isn’t the manpower available or perhaps this is deemed a low priority item

    I agree, and a web site called “Catholic Left” probably is not exactly the right forum. I cannot envision the majority of ordinariate members going to such a web site with any regularity!

    Norm.

    • donhenri01 says:

      A few answers:
      – St Timothy: the Episcopal Church keeps the property, full stop. The new ordinariate Catholic congregation was permitted to worship in it for a month (it was received there), but now worship at St Mark’s Catholic Church. I don’t know who lead them, since their pastor (Fr. Sweeney) is due to leave for Tennessee (he disappeared from their website)
      – St Peter Damian is the former name of the now St Joseph of Arimathea ordinariate congregation. Luke Reese stated on his blog that his ordination in the Catholic priesthood will not be before a few years at least, since he falls in the “3rd group”, that is the group of former Anglican priests needing to undergo very significant academic studies before being ordained.
      – St Mary the Virgin cannot be transferred into the ordinariate yet for a very simple reason: the RC diocese of Fort-Worth is sede-vacante (bishopless), pending the nomination of its new Bishop, and a diocesan administrator pro tempore doesn’t have the power to transfer a parish to another jurisdiction.

      + pax et bonum

      • Rev22:17 says:

        donhenri01,

        You wrote: – St Timothy: the Episcopal Church keeps the property, full stop. The new ordinariate Catholic congregation was permitted to worship in it for a month (it was received there), but now worship at St Mark’s Catholic Church. I don’t know who lead them, since their pastor (Fr. Sweeney) is due to leave for Tennessee (he disappeared from their website)

        It seems strange that the continuing Episcopal parish would keep the property but move out of it.

        But in any case, do you have a link to the group’s new web site?

        You wrote: – St Peter Damian is the former name of the now St Joseph of Arimathea ordinariate congregation. Luke Reese stated on his blog that his ordination in the Catholic priesthood will not be before a few years at least, since he falls in the “3rd group”, that is the group of former Anglican priests needing to undergo very significant academic studies before being ordained.

        I must have missed that detail regarding his ordination, but isn’t he still the lay administrator of the group? It seems equally strange that his name is not listed in that capacity on the web site.

        You wrote: – St Mary the Virgin cannot be transferred into the ordinariate yet for a very simple reason: the RC diocese of Fort-Worth is sede-vacante (bishopless), pending the nomination of its new Bishop, and a diocesan administrator pro tempore doesn’t have the power to transfer a parish to another jurisdiction.

        Ah, a very interesting nuance that makes a lot of sense. There actually is a way around the sede vacante situation — papal approval — but there’s also no need to rush the transfer so awaiting the installation of a new bishop is probably the easier path forward for that community.

        Anyway, thanks for the update!

        Norm.

  5. Matthew the Wayfarer says:

    It seems there is ample opportunity for volunteers to provide services to the Ordinariate if Msgr. Steeson would only ask. If I lived in Texas near Houston (Ordinariate Central) I would be willing to volunteer as I am retired. Seems like The Ordinary and the Ft. Worth gang are keeping a stranglehold on the Ordinariate. This worries me. Out here in SoCal I have nothing. I may wind up in Texas next year. The Orange County Group is way too far to drive with my old car and not ready to buy a new one. I e-mailed Father Barker twice about AU Mass and never received a response. La Quinta is a little closer than Santa Ana.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Matthew,

      You wrote: The Orange County Group is way too far to drive with my old car and not ready to buy a new one. I e-mailed Father Barker twice about AU Mass and never received a response. La Quinta is a little closer than Santa Ana.

      I’m not exactly sure where you are, but are you aware that there’s also an ordinariate congregation, named Saint Augustine of Canterbury, in Oceanside?

      Alternatively, if you are in the Los Angeles area, the web site of the Blessed John Henry Newman group in Orange County now has a page for an exploratory group in Los Angeles, including a contact form.

      Norm.

  6. EPMS says:

    We do not yet have any information about those who participated most recently in the OCSP formation program for potential ordinands, other than the three men ordained in Victoria BC. Several Canadian groups, and perhaps others, are being ministered to by local diocesan clergy; these at least would seem to look forward to having definite news about their prospects for local leadership of Anglican background, in some cases their long-time pastors. The resolution of several other cases: those seeking ordination who do not come with a group, those who married during the formation process, etc. will be helpful to others contemplating ordination.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s