Fr Kenyon makes it official!

Here’s the good news, which Fr. Lee Kenyon, the Dean of the Canadian Deanery of St. John the Baptist of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter has put into the comments section:

The four men who have had their rescripts signed by the Holy Father, Pope Francis are Douglas Hayman and Kipling Cooper (The Annunication, Ottawa), John Hodgins (St Thomas More, Toronto), and James Tilley (The Good Shepherd, Oshawa). Colin O’Rourke is now a seminarian of the Diocese of Calgary, and is currently spending a year at a seminary in the United States. I am hopeful that he will be ordained priest next summer, and have faculties for the Ordinariate. We continue to await good news from the CDF in Rome for Michael Shier (OLW, Vancouver), David Skelton (St Benedict, Edmonton), and Richard Harris (Our Lady of the Sign, Fredericton Junction). Praise God for the good news from Rome last week.

Also we heard something about how we are not supposed to be calling our liturgy Anglican Use any more.   It was something like  Divine Worship:  then-some-long-stuff-that-I-can’t-remember-with-Anglicanorum-coetibus in there somewhere.

And we are apparently not supposed to describe it as Anglican.

Which led to some private discussion among some of us parishioners about the difference between popular usage and a strict canonical definition.

For instance, we are a sodality, whatever that is, not a parish under canon law, but if someone asks me what parish I do to I doubt I am going to launch into a long explanation that it’s really a sodality, whatever that is.

I dunno.  Anglican is still going to be in my informal descriptions.   I think Anglican Use Catholic is still the simplest descriptor to what we are.

Another friend was arguing for the use of Anglican Rite Catholic.  Yes, he said he knows we are not technically a “rite” but just as Annunciation is not technically a parish, our liturgy is a rite in the sense that it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck etc.

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17 Responses to Fr Kenyon makes it official!

  1. EPMS says:

    Your remarks remind me of John Hepworth’s comment that if the (then) proposed Ordinariate was not a sui juris church, it looked remarkably like it. Yet it must be clear by now that the established ordinariates are by no means self-governing, and like most other things in the Latin Rite they are being run as tight ships. Those who left the Anglican church because of its lax attitude towards authority will certainly find all the authority they could wish for, and more, with the Holy Father and Holy Mother Church. Any news from +Hepworth, BTW?

    • Foolishness says:

      No news of Archbishop Hepworth lately, though I do think it’s time to get in touch with him again and let him know how well things are going and to thank him for everything he has done for us, now safely aboard the Mother Ship. As for authority, we’ve been glad of it, frankly. No more congregationalism for us, thank you very much. No more doctrinal arguments over such things as same-sex marriage or women’s ordination. Even in liturgical matters, there is peace, a willingness to abide by what the Church says. For example, when Fr. Reid read off the changes to the liturgy we must expect in November, mostly there were exclamations of appreciation for them and no one expressed disgruntled feelings about having to change yet again. What a difference from the old days in the run up to our reception in which every liturgical detail became a object of argument or debate. We haven’t found Catholic authority burdensome at all, but liberating!

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: Yet it must be clear by now that the established ordinariates are by no means self-governing, and like most other things in the Latin Rite they are being run as tight ships.

      The Orthodox Communion actually runs much tighter ships.

      Norm.

  2. Paul Nicholls ofs says:

    Since I have been in the Roman Catholic Church over 30 years and am now in the Ordinariate, unofficially I refer to myself as Roman Catholic of the Anglican Use. However, I know sertain people who have recently entered into communion with the Church of Rome may wish to refer to themselves as Anglican Use Catholic. I think, in talking to other Catholics, in explaining what we are, requires some form of distinction, even if it is on an unofficial level This leaves me wondering what will be place on the church billboard to distinguish us from other Roman Catholic churches.

    • Paul Nicholls ofs says:

      sertain should be certain. I must be losing it.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Paul,

      You wrote: This leaves me wondering what will be place on the church billboard to distinguish us from other Roman Catholic churches.

      The lines

      Deanery of St. John the Baptist
      Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter

      should work quite well in that regard, for now. In due course, the single line

      Personal Ordinariate of St. John the Baptist

      undoubtedly will take their place.

      Norm.

  3. Pingback: Fr Kenyon makes it official! | Catholic Canada

  4. Will Roper says:

    We could start using the term Walsingham Catholic, since that is the title of the Mother Ordinariate.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Will,

      You wrote: We could start using the term Walsingham Catholic, since that is the title of the Mother Ordinariate.

      Ah, the Personal Ordinariate of Walsingham really is NOT the “Mother” of the other ordinariates in any legitimate sense of that term.

      >> In monastic life, one speaks of a monastery’s “mother house” as the community from which its first members came, but neither the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter nor the Personal Ordinariate of the Southern Cross received their first members from the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham.

      >> In other religious orders, one speaks of a province’s “mother house” as the house where the province has its headquarters, its novitiate, and its infirmary, and thus the house where all members of the province enter religious life and to which they return when they complete their years of active ministry.

      >> One could also speak of a diocese having a “mother diocese” from which its territory was taken and to which its first clergy, often with the exception of its first bishop, previously belonged.

      But there is no meaningful sense in which the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham gave birth to either of the other ordinariates. Rather, each ordinariate was formed de nouveau with nothing coming from the others.

      Norm.

  5. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    From your quotation: We continue to await good news from the CDF in Rome for Michael Shier (OLW, Vancouver), David Skelton (St Benedict, Edmonton), and Richard Harris (Our Lady of the Sign, Fredericton Junction).

    There’s another very significant piece of information here — the identification of three communities that have come into the Catholic Church but are not yet part of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. These congregations clearly are in the “holding pattern” of pastoral care by the local diocese that we have discussed from time to time. We can anticipate their transition into the Deanery of St. John the Baptist of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter upon the Catholic ordination of their former Anglican clergy.

    Norm.

    • grahame says:

      All

      Writing as a member of the Catholic laity what we are called by the Church is all that matters as far as l am concerned. I must say however ( if I were to add anything) that I find it worrisome that SOME Ordinariate members l have encountered are quick to disabuse anyone of the notion that they are ‘Roman’ in any way, shape or form. As l have said before here my approach is to tell other Christians and folks of other Confessions or none that I am a Catholic, pure and simple. I then tell them in no uncertain terms that in my view that means submission to the Pope and the Church he heads on earth. If after that they want to know more about rites and usages l will elaborate but l hardly think that is necessary in the early stages of discussion. I am interested in the thoughts of other Catholics on this issue.

      GCT

  6. P.K.T.P. says:

    In all of this, I am uncertain about what term is supposed to be used. Are they saying that the term ‘Anglican’ is not proper to the Ordinariates? It seems to me that it might be proper, as the Latin m.p. is Anglicanorum Cœtibus. We may have to play a bit with terms such as usus, forma and ritus, it seems to me. In general practice, ‘uses’ are local or proper variations of the Roman Rite: local if they pertain to specific dioceses; proper, if they pertain to definite religious orders. So we have the Braga Use and the Dominican Use, although I’ve seen the latter called the Dominican Rite. The term ‘rite’ seems to refer to liturgical forms which are distinctive enough to be governed separately and by special means. Hence the Archbishop of Milan is called the ‘Chief’ of the Ambrosian Rite; the Archbishop of Toledo, the Chief of the Mozarabic Rite. This despite the fact that both Rites are also permitted in certain other sees. Well, in the case of the Mozarabic one, it is permitted in Salamanca as well. The Ambrosian one is used in some parishes in other dioceses north of Milan.

    The problem with calling our new faithful ‘Ordinariate’ Catholics is that there are also military ordinariates and Romanian ordinariates and Latin-Church Ordinariates for mixed groups of Eastern-Rite faithful. All quite a jumble, I’m afraid.

    I agree with posters here who like the term ‘Anglican Use’. But I wonder if it might apply to the pastoral provision form of Mass (Book of Divine Worship) and those from there who are staying out of the Ordinariate in the U.S.A.

  7. P.K.T.P. says:

    Thank you, Fr. Kenyon, for this information, and for letting us know that Fr. Hodgins, of the Canterburian Anglican Church of Canada, will be serving in Toronto, as he was not from there but from the Anglican Diocese of Huron, I believe. It is extremely important that there be an Ordinariate community in Toronto, the most populous City in all of Canada.

    We are all praying for the candidates, I’m sure, and are hoping for rescripts for the others on your list. In addition, and without naming persons, I wonder if Fr. Kenyon could let us know whether or not other candidates from the Anglican-Catholic Church of Canada, might be ordained after some further period of study. I am referring to those who are not on the list he has furnished. Some of us know some of the people I am referring to and I’m not asking that they be named on-line, only if we may know that some of them are being considered for ordination under certain conditions.

  8. Lee Kenyon says:

    I know of no other men who are currently under consideration in Canada, other than one man who is considering the diaconate, for the Ordinariate, here in Calgary, and one other who might be considered down the line, and who is not a million miles from where you are, Mr Perkins…

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