Victoria Bishop Gagnon named Archbishop of Winnipeg

Bishop Richard Gagnon has been a great friend to the Ordinariate and our clergy and parish out in Victoria, B.C.

He will be leaving soon to become Archbishop of Winnipeg, following the retirement announced today of Archbishop James Weisgerber, who I got to know through his service as president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB).   I always found him most cheerful and charming in any dealings.  I wish him well in his retirement.

And congratulations (or condolences!) to Archbishop-elect Gagnon!

Here’s the CCCB news release:

CCCB – Ottawa)… His Holiness Pope Francis today accepted the resignation of the Most Reverend V. James Weisgerber as Archbishop of Winnipeg, and named as his successor the Most Reverend Richard Gagnon. At the time of his appointment, the Archbishop-elect was Bishop of Victoria. Archbishop Weisgerber has been responsible for the Archdiocese for the past 13 years. He had offered his resignation to the Holy Father when reaching the age of 75, as required by the Code of Canon Law.

Born in 1948 in Lethbridge, Alberta, Archbishop-elect Gagnon studied philosophy, history and English at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, in addition to earning a teaching certificate. After doing seminary studies at the Pontifical Beda College in Rome, he was ordained to the priesthood in 1983 for the Archdiocese of Vancouver. He served there in many capacities, including as pastor, Vicar General, archdiocesan consultor, director of the office of religious education, and member of the presbyteral council. He was named Bishop of Victoria in 2004. Archbishop-elect Gagnon served from 2007 to 2008 on the Permanent Council of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB). He is currently a member of its English Sector Commission for Liturgy and the Sacraments, and had previously been a member of the Sector’s former Commission for Social Communications. He has served on the Board of Catholic Missions in Canada since 2009.

weisgerberBefore being named to the Archdiocese of Winnipeg, Archbishop Weisgerber was Bishop of Saskatoon, 1996 to 2000. Previously, he had been a priest of the Archdiocese of Regina and, from 1990 to 1996, General Secretary of the CCCB. As a Bishop and member of the CCCB, Archbishop Weisgerber served on its Commission for Social Affairs (now the Commission for Justice and Peace) as a member and consequently its Chairman, as well as being a member of the English Sector Commission for Liturgy (as it was then called). After being elected to the CCCB Permanent Council as an English Sector representative in 2003, he was elected by the other members of the Council as CCCB Co-Treasurer. In 2005, the members of the Conference elected him Vice President, and from 2007 to 2009 as their President. In 2001, he was a CCCB delegate at the Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on The Bishop: Servant of the Gospel of Jesus Christ for the Hope of the World. From 2001 to 2002, he was appointed by the Holy See to the International Methodist and Roman Catholic Dialogue. Archbishop Weisgerber had a key role in helping organize the delegation of representatives from the Assembly of First Nations and the Catholic Church in Canada whom Pope Benedict XVI received in audience on April 29, 2009. It was on this occasion that the Holy Father expressed his sorrow at the anguish caused by “the deplorable conduct of some members of the Church” in the operations and management of the former Indian Residential Schools.

According to the CCCB 2013 Directory, the Archdiocese of Winnipeg has 89 parishes and missions, with a Catholic population of 158,095, served by 61 diocesan priests, 23 priests who are members of religious communities, 111 Sisters and Brothers, also members of religious communities, and 18 permanent deacons.

 

 

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4 Responses to Victoria Bishop Gagnon named Archbishop of Winnipeg

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: Bishop Richard Gagnon has been a great friend to the Ordinariate and our clergy and parish out in Victoria, B.C.

    He will be leaving soon to become Archbishop of Winnipeg, following the retirement announced today of Archbishop James Weisgerber, who I got to know through his service as president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB). I always found him most cheerful and charming in any dealings. I wish him well in his retirement.

    And congratulations (or condolences!) to Archbishop-elect Gagnon!

    Archbishop-elect Gagnon most assuredly will continue to be a friend of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. Perhaps he will be instrumental in the formation of an ordinariate community in Winnipeg!

    Norm.

    • P.K.T.P. says:

      Mr. Norm is right for once. Yes, Bishop Gagnon is a very great friend of the Ordinariate community in Canada.

      On the matter of Winnipeg, there has not been for many years any TAC presence in Winnipeg and really just silence from Manitoba. For there to develop an ordinariate community in such an important City, it would likely come from either the Canterburian Anglican Church of Canada or from that new Anglican network (from which one Canadian ordinariate priest has already come in Calgary). The Anglican Network, as far as I can make out, consists of Anglicans who firmly reject blessings for sexual inverts. They have two or three priests in Vancouver. I don`t know their status in Winnipeg but my sense of things is that Winnipeg is a dead zone for Anglicanism in general. I could be wrong about that and would welcome being corrected on it.

      P.K.T.P.

  2. Pingback: Victoria Bishop Gagnon named Archbishop of Winnipeg | Catholic Canada

  3. P.K.T.P. says:

    Bishop Gagnon is no traditionalist but he is a very kind pastor of souls and he will be sorely missed by traditional Catholics here in Victoria. All of the people in the Latin Mass community love him and think that he will make an excellent Archbishop of Winnipeg. Since I believe very strongly in the practice of labelling people, I would say that Archbishop Gagnon, as he now becomes, is a `conservative` bishop.

    There is a healthy Latin Mass community in Winnipeg approved finally, at long last, by the outgoing liberal Archbishop Weisgerber; and also with the support of the (very good) Archbishop of St. Boniface next door (as it is for both Archdioceses). Traditionalists in Canada will not be sad to see Weisgerber go but, you know, I am not supposed to say such things. It`s not polite, you know. Manners, not truth, is what is important, and part of middle-class manners is to say nice things about people you don`t much care for or like, so that there is little correspondence between what one thinks and what one says. At the very least, the well-mannered technique is to say nothing at all about people you despise, like Cardinal Mahony or Bishop De Roo. We mustn`t suggest that we somehow don`t approve of them as they devastate entire dioceses. Shhh! The Latin Mass supporters in Winnipeg had access to our Mass for a brief period in the late 1980s. It was cancelled altogether in 1989 and did not resurface until 2008 in Brandon, at first, despite the pleas of our people there. It was not restored to Winnipeg on the every-Sunday basis until well after the issuance of `Summorum Pontificum`, coming to the City only two or three years ago.

    I think that Bishop Gagnon is a very spiritual Bishop and will be excellent for Winnipeg. As for Victoria, please pray for us, as we don`t know who the new man will be here.

    P.K.T.P.

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