Fr Hunwicke is back blogging

And has some most interesting posts:

I suggest the Twentieth Century liturgical changes would most appropriately be called the Pian-Pauline Reforms. They are changes based on exactly that notion of papal power which Benedict XVI so acutely criticises: that the Pope can do anything. The process of liturgical ‘reform’ has, from the beginning, been the product of the maximalising Papacy of Pius XII. The ‘Council’ has only been an episode in that process. I never ceased to be amazed by this central paradox of mid-twentieth century Catholic history: that the ‘Progressives’ and ‘Liberals’were able to transform the Latin Church pretty well overnight by manipulating an absolutist model of Papal power.

I think it will be very interesting to see, over the medium term, how Pope Francis understands his Ministry. It can be easy for a good man with admirable motives and who is facing real problems to use the power which his position gives him to take short cuts. It takes a very learned and a very truly humble Pontiff – such as a Benedict XIV or a Benedict XVI – to understand, and to internalise his perception of, what  he ought not to do (and I’m not only talking about Liturgy). Pope Francis’s two recent utterances which bear upon the Hermeneutic of Continuity make me cautiously optimistic. If this man can consolidate the gains made by our beloved Pope Benedict XVI and at the same time prudently develop the teaching of the Magisterium about the Preferential Option for the Poor, he could turn out to be a great Pontiff.
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*Fr Aidan Nichols reports that Fr Adrian Fortescue, nearly a century ago, wrote “The Pope is not an irresponsible tyrant who can do anything with the Church that he likes. He is bound on every side …”

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1 Response to Fr Hunwicke is back blogging

  1. Pingback: Fr Hunwicke is back blogging | Catholic Canada

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