A great post on ballroom dancing

Reminds me of something C.S. Lewis once wrote.  This is by my friend Sheila Wray Gregoire, a Canadian author and columnist:

I knew he would have rather done just about anything, including going clothes shopping with a bunch of women, than grace the dance floor with his presence, but I took him at his word, and off to waltz we went.

He spent most of that first lesson staring at his feet as he attempted to count 1-2-3, 1-2-3. When he got the courage and the rhythm to look up, he found that all the other men in the room sported the hugest smiles on their faces. He felt like a lout. He was the worst husband in the world. Here these men were, enjoying themselves for their wives’ benefit, and he had such a bad attitude.

When we arrived home that night, he figured out why all the other men were smiling.

The next week, Keith rushed home from work and said, “Honey, it’s Thursday night! Let’s go dancing!”

So this Valentine’s Day, I would like to tell you men why ballroom dancing should be in your future. It’s not only for the obvious benefits that my husband discovered early on. It’s also because it really does change your relationship. It makes you work together. It makes you smile. But most of all, it makes you feel like a man.

In most areas of our lives today, the sexes are interchangeable. A woman can do whatever a man can do, and vice versa. Dancing is one of the few areas of life where you have to either be a man or be a woman. You each have very defined roles, and it reminds you that you are two very different halves of one whole.

And the only way to get good at it is for the woman to figure out that she has to let the man lead. Last Thursday I actually said to my husband, “You’ve got to start pushing me around more!” In no other area of our relationship will those words ever cross my lips. But if you’ve ever longed to hear her say, “just show me what you want me to do,” or “You decide and I’ll follow,” you’ve got to hit the dance floor.

Dancing doesn’t work if she tries to take control. You really do get to decide pretty much everything. And once she realizes that it works better that way, she can be putty in your hands. Plus, it is awfully romantic.

While you get to feel like a man, she gets to feel like a princess as you twirl her around. Ballroom dancing isn’t the jumping up and down most of us are used to doing on the dance floor. It’s about treating her like she’s precious, and showing her off to the world. What woman doesn’t want to be treated like that?

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to A great post on ballroom dancing

  1. Pingback: A great post on ballroom dancing | Catholic Canada

  2. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    From your quote: He spent most of that first lesson staring at his feet as he attempted to count 1-2-3, 1-2-3. When he got the courage and the rhythm to look up, he found that all the other men in the room sported the hugest smiles on their faces.

    Yes, this is fairly typical. It takes some repetition to get a new dance step “programmed” into so-called “muscle memory” so one can do it without concentration. We all remember, with gratitude, the much more experienced partners who dragged us out onto the dance floor when we would have sat on the sidelines watching out of fear of self-embarrassment, who patiently but persistently beckoned us onto the dance floor and encouraged us to dance the most basic steps with them even though they were far more advanced dancers while reassuring us that it was perfectly okay that we were less capable than they, until we got over that hurdle and confidence began to overcome our fears.

    From your quotation: So this Valentine’s Day, I would like to tell you men why ballroom dancing should be in your future. It’s not only for the obvious benefits that my husband discovered early on. It’s also because it really does change your relationship. It makes you work together. It makes you smile. But most of all, it makes you feel like a man.

    Yes, that’s all true — and there are two more very significant benefits.

    >> 1. Ballroom dancing is phenomenally good exercise, especially once you advance beyond the beginner stage, targeting not only the arms and legs and the cardiovascular system, but the core as well. A few seasons ago, a player of the National Football League who appeared as a contestant on Dancing with the Stars, remarking on this, said that, in the course of learning and practicing routines for the show, he found muscles that he never knew that he had.

    >> 2. By and large, the people whom I have met in ballroom dancing circles are very pleasant, kind, and caring — the kind of people whom I want to count as my social friends. Of course, YMMV.

    If you are not sure where to get started, Arthur Murray International has franchised studios in most major cities throughout North America, and in Europe as well, and they have a well designed syllabus and a program of inspection to ensure that all affiliated studios are teaching up to standard. Unaffiliated studios may be cheaper, but they are also woefully inconsistent.

    By way of full disclosure, I have no financial interest whatsoeer in Arthur Murray International or in any of its franchised studios.

    From your quote: Dancing doesn’t work if she tries to take control. You really do get to decide pretty much everything. And once she realizes that it works better that way, she can be putty in your hands.

    Yup. pretty much the antithesis of radical feminism!

    And guys, if you are single, call the local studio and sign up for lessons and classes. Most studios have a significant number of unattached ladies, many of whom are quite attractive and very pleasant, who are looking for dance partners, and there’s always the possibility that a dance partnership could evolve into something more.

    Norm.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s