Ecumenism vs. the demands of the Zeitgeist

Commentary from Let Nothing You Dismay blog:

Clearly, by his wholehearted support of the recent decision of the Church of England’s General Synod to proceed to the ordination of women to the episcopate, the Archbishop of Canterbury believes – without even the slightest hesitation – that the recently invented Anglican ‘tradition’ of women bishops and clergy is of infinitely more importance than unity with the ancient Churches of East and West.
That, however, is not what he says … is it?

For the modern Anglican ‘liberal’ (and no one now becomes an Anglican (Arch)bishop in the west without being such to all intents and purposes) ecumenism is an excellent goal and an engrossing hobby but, regardless of the dominical command, in terms of theological substance it is as light as a feather when weighed in the balance alongside the demands of the zeitgeist. The uncritical adoption of the modern rights and equalities agenda means that the goal of full and visible unity – “full communion” – has been postponed to an indefinite and indeterminable future. And those who are in support of this generation’s radical breaking and remaking of Anglicanism know that very well.

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3 Responses to Ecumenism vs. the demands of the Zeitgeist

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    From your quotation: Clearly, by his wholehearted support of the recent decision of the Church of England’s General Synod to proceed to the ordination of women to the episcopate, the Archbishop of Canterbury believes – without even the slightest hesitation – that the recently invented Anglican ‘tradition’ of women bishops and clergy is of infinitely more importance than unity with the ancient Churches of East and West.

    There’s no doubt that the recent decision of the Church of England to ordain women to the episcopate is a departure from past practice, but the reaction does seem to be a bit excessive on at least two counts.

    >> 1. How, and why, does the ordination of women as bishops pose any more difficulty for ecumenism than the ordination of women to the order of presbyter, which has been the practice of the Church of England for a couple decades now?

    >> 2. How, and why, does the ordination of women as bishops in the Church of England pose any more difficulty for ecumenism than the ordination of women as bishops in other provinces of the Anglican Communion, as also has been established practice for a couple decades?

    The bottom line is that reconciliation of the Anglican Schism will require either (1) a change in Catholic policy regarding ordination of women (don’t hold your breath waiting for that to happen!) or (2) Anglican acceptance that female clergy will not receive Catholic ordination, and thus will have to forfeit their positions (also not very likely!). The recent vote by the Church of England to allow episcopal ordination of women within its own ranks did not change that reality one iota.

    Norm.

  2. Richard Grand says:

    I made a similar comment to Norm’s about another recent post. Women have been priests in Canada for over thirty years and bishops almost as long. What has been said here seems to fail to recognize that nothing new has happened-it just happened (to the episcopate) in England. Even Wales, Scotland, and Ireland have their own separate polities. What is the purpose of endlessly printing comments that reinforce the point of view of those who have already opted for the Ordinariate? This doesn’t affect you, assuming that you are not having second thoughts. If you came from a “continuing Anglican” group, such the Anglican Catholic Church, this never was an issue. What is the point of all this negativity about a Church that you don’t belong to and, in many cases, never did? May I be permitted to say that, in places where women have been priests and even bishops, the work and ministry of the Church have carried on, in fact very well. There are many much larger issues, such as the secularism of our culture, that affect us more and are of greater concern.

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