Fr. Carl Reid returns to Ottawa for a visit

And we also had a visit from a delightful young man, Jack Grimes, who attends our Ordinariate parish in Scranton, PA.

Here are some pictures.  It was so good to see Fr. Carl again!

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15 Responses to Fr. Carl Reid returns to Ottawa for a visit

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: It was so good to see Fr. Carl again!

    How is the Sodality of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary doing in terms of growth?

    Norm.

    • EPMS says:

      Norm, the Sodality of the Annunciation BVM is in Ottawa and is attended by Mrs Gyapong, our blogger. So I think you are the one who is confused.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote: Norm, the Sodality of the Annunciation BVM is in Ottawa and is attended by Mrs Gyapong, our blogger.

        Yes, I know that. In fact, I addressed my question to Deborah precisely because she has first-hand knowledge.

        You continued: So I think you are the one who is confused.

        No, not at all.

        If you look below, you will see that my other question to Paul pertained to St. Thomas More in Toronto.

        Or perhaps I was in fact misled by the placement of your question in a reply to a post other than the post to which it pertained….

        Norm.

  2. Paul Nicholls ofs says:

    Good question. I would also like to know how other Ordinariate communities are doing. I won’t comment much on the situation in Oshawa, only to say that this group continues to remain very small.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Paul,

      You wrote: I won’t comment much on the situation in Oshawa, only to say that this group continues to remain very small.

      How about the St. Thomas More community in downtown Toronto? Its pastor’s personal blog indicated that they were developing a program of evangelical outreach intended to grow the community into an official parish.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        I hope every group is developing a “program of evangelical outreach”. Unless they share the details, and their success or lack thereof, the rest of the Ordinariate does not get the benefit, however. I take the fact that Norm’s question of September 2 above has gone unanswered to mean that this group is in a holding pattern. Yet, like St John the Evangelist, Calgary, this began as a well-established parish group of 40 or 50, with its own church, in a fairly large urban centre. Why have the experiences of the two parishes been different, assuming that is the case? Treating these issues as unfathomable mysteries better left unmentioned may be a strategy to spare feelings in the short run, but is neither accurate nor helpful, finally.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        EPMS,

        You wrote: I take the fact that Norm’s question of September 2 above has gone unanswered to mean that this group is in a holding pattern.

        I think that to be a bad assumption. I directed the question specifically to an individual who might not have returned to this web site, and thus might not have seen it because I was interested in an evaluation by an outsider. A couple months ago, a blog operated by this group’s administrator/chaplain described the group’s development of a plan to grow into an official mission and then a parish, in consultation with the ordinary. That does not exactly sound like the “holding pattern” that you surmise.

        Of course, you have to develop a plan before you can execute it — and the summer vacation period is not exactly the best time to launch a new initiative. Thus, the St. Thomas More group probably timed its plan to roll out out its new initiatives this weekend. Of course, it’s also likely that the group has already attracted some new members if it is healthy.

        This is, however, another situation of a lot happening under the radar horizon.

        Yet, like St John the Evangelist, Calgary, this began as a well-established parish group of 40 or 50, with its own church, in a fairly large urban centre.

        Hunh?

        You are horribly confused here. This is the group that Cardinal Collins assembled from a former presbyter and a number of parishioners who came individually or as families from many parishes of the Anglican Church in Canada (ACC). They were NOT a community before they came into the Catholic Church. They are presently sharing facilities with Sacre Coeur parish, which is a personal parish for French-speaking residents of the Archdiocese of Toronto, as the do NOT have their own church.

        You asked: Why have the experiences of the two parishes been different, assuming that is the case?

        Every community has a unique combination of resources, by which I mean the talents, skills, abilities, and material and financial resources of its clergy and its parishioners, and therefore must formulate programs that will work within the constraints of its own resources and that will use its own resources to maximum advantage. There is no “one size fits all” here. An approach that is highly effective in one community may fail miserably in another, either because the latter community is missing a resource or a talent that’s critical for its success or because it crosses some aspect of the local culture. By way of example, a congregation in an “inner city” (very poor) neighborhood can gather a lot of people very easily by putting on inexpensive suppers with some entertainment that interweaves the gospel message — but this works only if it has a suitable hall, members who can cook a decent meal, and members who can provide some sort of entertainment (singing, comedy, or whatever). Of course, this approach also would not gather much attendance in an affluent neighborhood — there, one should instead seek to make inroads at the local country club, tennis club, or other social organization.

        Norm.

  3. EPMS says:

    Looking around for information regarding what constitutes a parish, or a quasi-parish, the key point seems to be “stability”, which I interpret to mean a group of people of a certain size and including an age range which permits one to predict that it will continue on into the foreseeable future. Clearly a small group of elderly people will not meet this standard, and unless one is content to worship in an ecclesiastical palliative care facility this will be a problem.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You said: Looking around for information regarding what constitutes a parish, or a quasi-parish, the key point seems to be “stability”, which I interpret to mean a group of people of a certain size and including an age range which permits one to predict that it will continue on into the foreseeable future.

      To become a parish, a community must be stable and self-sufficient; that is, its collections must be sufficient to pay its bills.

      The term “quasi-parish” is the generic canonical term for a forming community such as a mission or a chaplaincy that, for whatever reason, is not canonically erected as a parish but that provides the same cadre of pastoral services for a reasonably stable community.

      You said: Clearly a small group of elderly people will not meet this standard, and unless one is content to worship in an ecclesiastical palliative care facility this will be a problem.

      The demographics of a congregation clearly can be a factor in the decision, there’s also consideration of the demographics of the larger community. A parish clearly must have a reliable source of new members to replace those who move away or die, but that source need not be multigenerational families. In a retirement community (in Florida or Arizona, for example), it may be a steady inflow of new retirees to replace those who die off. Likewise, in a college or university town, it may be a steady influx of new students to replace those who graduate coupled with a stable cadre of faculty, staff, employees of local businesses, and their families.

      Norm.

  4. Richard Grand says:

    “I take the fact that Norm’s question of September 2 above has gone unanswered to mean that this group is in a holding pattern. Yet, like St John the Evangelist, Calgary, this began as a well-established parish group of 40 or 50, with its own church, in a fairly large urban centre.” I assumed that EPMS was referring to the Ottawa and not the Toronto group in this description. From what I can gather, the Calgary group has attracted persons who were already Roman Catholics for their liturgy, etc. However, the Ottawa group had a conflict of sorts when some of its members declined to enter the Ordinariate. Ms. Gyapong has already mentioned this fact in her blog.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Richard,

      You wrote: From what I can gather, the Calgary group has attracted persons who were already Roman Catholics for their liturgy, etc.

      Yes, and those who previously came to the Catholic Church from various Anglican bodies can become members of the ordinariate and the parish. I hope that ALL of the ordinariate congregations are doing this.

      You wrote: However, the Ottawa group had a conflict of sorts when some of its members declined to enter the Ordinariate. Ms. Gyapong has already mentioned this fact in her blog.

      Yes, I’m aware — many members departed before the group’s core came into the Catholic Church from the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC). That, however, has little to do with what has happened since the group’s core came into the ordinariate.

      There is one additional factor here, though: the Sodality of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary did have a change in pastoral leadership associated with Fr. Carl Reid’s return to British Columbia.

      Norm.

  5. EPMS says:

    Norm, I’m glad we sorted this out. I did refer to your question by date (September 2) because there was no “reply” line underneath it and I knew there would be a separation. Your question about the Toronto group was posted September 3. Mr Grand, I am not sure why the defection of some Annunciation of the BVM parishioners would have had an impact on its growth once it entered the Ordinariate. By no means all the St John’s parishioners entered the Catholic church either; Fr Kenyon thanked those parishes which had received those who chose to stay Anglicans in one of his early statements.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You wrote: I did refer to your question by date (September 2) because there was no “reply” line underneath it and I knew there would be a separation.

      Yes, but I caught that only after the fact. Natural instinct, for better or worse, is to look only at the chain of comments.

      Norm.

  6. Richard Grand says:

    No one has yet answered Rev.22.17’s original question posted September 2nd re. growth in Ottawa.

    • Foolishness says:

      We’re holding stable in Ottawa. One more person will be received into the Ordinariate in a couple of weeks; two were received a few weeks back. We have a good nucleus of young adults, youngish clergy and I think our Father Doug Hayman is one of the best preachers I’ve ever heard. And Fr. Kipling also has amazing gifts as a priest. Of course, we lost Fr. Carl and Barbara Reid, which was a blow. I am very hopeful about the future for Annunciation. We have a real community that’s been tested in the fire and it’s amazing what we have come through.

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