So, what do you think of St. Patrick’s Day

This post was up for a while on an American diocese’s website and has since been taken down, but if you follow the link you can still read the whole thing.

Here’s an excerpt:

Let’s be honest: St. Patrick’s Day nationally has become a disgraceful display of drunkenness and foolishness in the middle of Lent that more often embarrasses the memory of Patrick than honors it.

 

I remember driving through Ottawa one St. Patrick’s Day when it was a little warmer than usual for March and being amazed at the long lines of people wearing green waiting to get into bars.

So, what do you think?

Me?  I agree with the author and I hope he doesn’t get in trouble for his lamentation.

Christmas and Easter have been pretty much hijacked, too, come to think of it.

 

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One Response to So, what do you think of St. Patrick’s Day

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You asked: So, what do you think?

    Me? I agree with the author and I hope he doesn’t get in trouble for his lamentation.

    This poem reminds me of a poem titled “Everything’s Jake at O’Shaughnessey’s on the Seventeenth of March” that appeared in a collection of verse titled My Wild Irish Woes by Kevin D. Leahy (Straub Printing and Publishing Co., Inc., Seattle, WA, 1977) that I purchased at a Christian bookshop while serving aboard a ship in overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA. I won’t quote the whole poem to avoid copyright violation, but here are the last four very poignant stanzas.

    Yet how can we miss her, and what does it mean
    To be lonesome for valleys we never have seen;
    To long for the sights of her castles and lakes,
    And sing at her weddings and dance at her wakes?

    But whether her ancestors sailed out of Kerry
    Or came to our shores on the Bremerton ferry,
    Our love for the Auld Sod is right from the heart
    And by mid-afternoon you can’t tell us apart.

    Our spirits will rise as the Harp begins flowing,
    And Terrance Mulcahey, with confidence growing,
    (Tho’ timid by nature, and built like an elf)
    Will soon be believin’ he’s John L. himself.

    So Erin go bragh — let the curtains be parted!
    The party’s begun and the swingin’ has started.
    And if to a stranger out customs seem quaint,
    Sure we’re raisin’ the devil — to honor “The Saint.”

    I highly commend this whole collection to the reading of anybody who can land a copy!

    You said: Christmas and Easter have been pretty much hijacked, too, come to think of it.

    Yes, but that’s not really new. A century ago, it was quite common for parishioners to get into the Christmas spirits well before “midnight mass.” In fact, this is why the most edition of the Roman Missal now calls this mass the “mass during the night” and many parishes now celebrate it well before midnight.

    More importantly, Satan will do anything — and I really do mean anything — to lead people away from authentic worship of God. Satan is quite happy to secularize the celebration of a Christian festival so that it ceases to be an authentic celebration. As Christians, we need to reassert the authentic celebration.

    Norm.

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