I don’t agree with this analysis

Adam Shaw at Fox News has a news item about Cardinal Burke’s demotion and how it has quelled the conservative revolt.

He writes:

A recent meeting of bishops unleashed what one Vatican watcher called “a tsunami of conservative backlash” against the pope when it followed an agenda that sought to revisit long-held doctrine on controversial social issues. The most vocal critic was American Cardinal Raymond Burke, who described the Church under Francis as like “a ship without a rudder.” But as conservative bishops and lower-level clergy in the U.S. began to signal their agreement, Burke quickly found himself demoted from his powerful Vatican post to a purely ceremonial role.

The move sent a chill through the ranks of American conservative bishops, nearly two dozen of whom declined comment when contacted by FoxNews.com, despite many having previously expressed strong doubts about the church’s leftward swerve under Francis, who assumed the papacy in 2013.
This makes is sound like the Pope demoted Cardinal Burke because of what he said during and after the extraordinary synod.
That’s not the case from what I understand.
I heard rumors from reliable sources that Cardinal Burke had been notified of the demotion well before the synod.  I think I heard this news some time in early to mid September and some people were wondering if it would come into effect before the synod.   If the demotion had taken place before the synod, then Cardinal Burke would not have been able to attend automatically as a Vatican prefect.
I wish the mainstream media would focus on some of Pope Francis recent statements about the family and about life, which are certainly not representative of a progressive agenda.
But no, they won’t.
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5 Responses to I don’t agree with this analysis

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: This makes is sound like the Pope demoted Cardinal Burke because of what he said during and after the extraordinary synod.

    That’s not the case from what I understand.

    I heard rumors from reliable sources that Cardinal Burke had been notified of the demotion well before the synod. I think I heard this news some time in early to mid September and some people were wondering if it would come into effect before the synod. If the demotion had taken place before the synod, then Cardinal Burke would not have been able to attend automatically as a Vatican prefect.

    I’m really not persuaded that it’s fair to refer to Cardinal Burke’s reassignment as a demotion. In reality, the influence of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura is quite limited because there are very few cases that actually can come before it. This is one major difference between the English legal system, which is the basis of secular government in the United States, Canada, and Australia, and the Roman legal system followed by Catholic tribunals: in the latter, a matter becomes res iudicata, excluding further appeal, as soon as two tribunals render the same verdict. The majority of cases that come before Catholic tribunals go in first instance to a diocesan tribunal, in second instance to a tribunal of another dioceses, and in third instance to the Roman Rota if the two diocesan tribunals render different verdicts. Since the verdict of the Roman Rota must concur with one or the other of the diocesan tribunals, its verdict settles the matter. In reality, the cases that come before the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura generally involve limits of authority, conflicts between ecclesiastical authorities, and failure of ecclesiastical authorities to follow proper procedure — all of which are relatively infrequent.

    You continued: I wish the mainstream media would focus on some of Pope Francis recent statements about the family and about life, which are certainly not representative of a progressive agenda.

    But no, they won’t.

    Your analysis is correct, but it’s actually Traditionalists who seem to be portraying our wonderful pope as a radical progressive that he is not. The liberal media are simply picking up that story line out of wishful thinking.

    Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    The idea that reassignment to the largely ceremonial headship of a charitable organisation, a post normally held by an otherwise retired Cardinal in his eighties, is not a demotion for the 66 year old Cardinal Burke is not one I have seen expressed by any other source. He himself did not suggest that it was a new challenge he was eagerly looking forward to. And of course he had already not been reappointed to the Congregation for Bishops, clearly an influential post.

    • John Walter S. says:

      Technically, it’s not a demotion, because Cardinals aren’t sort of “Super Bishops” but have added responsibilities to the Pope. He was just reassigned.

      It’s not a demotion, but it’s akin to troublesome priests being reassigned to the Diocese of Tehran or something. It has to be with the Knights of Malta, because evil prelates can’t think of any ways of doing something terrible to Card. Burke without looking like outright villains.

      What is important is that Cardinal Burke does not show himself to be a vain person who cares about the opinions people have about him, even that of his peers. He’s totally been portrayed as such, merely because he wants to put the best for the liturgy- truly, his humility is as such that in his giving God the best, he follows the tradition of the Temple priesthood, of donning robes with precious stones and metal in service of God. If God did not approve of it, why would God demand it for Himself as stated in Scripture?

      Different from Kasper the Friendly Liar, who had to make excuses about his hidden racism and bigotry to the point where a journalist almost lost his career from it, if the journalist hadn’t recorded the exact words Kasper made about African bishops and their opinions. So much talk of the poor, but helping themselves from the coffers of the Church, much like Judas. Those are the people who pray: “God, I thank you, that I’m a broad-minded and tolerant person. Everyone has their own moral standards; and it’s not for me to judge. But thank God I’m not like that narrow-minded bigot over there, that Pharisee.”

      The great reversal that every Traditionalist hopes for is the election of Burke to the Papacy, and he’ll wear a fancy papal tiara, parade in the sede gestatoria, and he’ll require the Extraordinary Form to be the only Form, as he hands out excommunications left and right to the jubilation of the faithful and ringing of bells of St. Peter’s.

      It’s a delusion, out of touch with how it’ll all most likely go down, which is to say, terribly.

  3. EPMS says:

    Of greater relevance to former Anglicans, perhaps, is the appointment of Cardinal Sarah as the new head of the CDW, following the replacement of two senior undersecretaries. Will there be implications for the work of the Anglicanae Traditiones group?

    • Rev22:17 says:

      EPMS,

      You asked: Of greater relevance to former Anglicans, perhaps, is the appointment of Cardinal Sarah as the new head of the CDW, following the replacement of two senior undersecretaries. Will there be implications for the work of the Anglicanae Traditiones group?

      Unfortunately, that question is not so simple as to admit a “yes” or “no” answer.

      >> Officially, there’s no change to the mission of the Anglicanae Traditiones committee — it is still tasked with preparing liturgical rites for the ordinariates. Thus, in principle, it should not matter.

      >> But in practice, the new Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments may have different priorities with the consequence that the work might proceed more quickly or more slowly.

      >> And also in practice, the new Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments may have a different perspective on the liturgy and thus might inject a different set of priorities that could result in some difference in the product. By way of example, the new prefect might deem it important to provide the option of contemporary language whereas the outgoing prefect apparently did not.

      “Like the ski resort full of girls hunting for husbands and husbands hunting for girls, the situation is not as symmetrical as it might seem.” — Alan MacKay

      Norm.

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