Interesting article about Archbishop Corrigan

Was he the Cardinal Burke of his time?

From The Catholic Thing an article by Brad Miner:

For his part, Michael Corrigan stood firmly against Americanism, and – history being written by the victors – he has been rewarded with odium; called paranoid and dishonest, a believer in a “phantom heresy.” In fact, he was a figure of almost unimpeachable character and, surprising in an archbishop, considerable holiness.

But he had the temerity to agree with Pope Leo, who, after admitting in Testem that the Faith has always adapted itself to new cultures, nevertheless condemns the idea that the Spirit moves individuals to adaptations contrary to papal authority and the Magisterium. The true Church, he writes . . .

. . . is one: as by unity of doctrine, so by unity of government, and she is catholic also. Since God has placed the center and foundation of unity in the chair of Blessed Peter, she is rightly called the Roman Church.

Thus was the “spirit” of Americanism condemned, and Corrigan vindicated – at least for a short while. Soon enough, that adaptation to the splintering effects of democracy would strain relations with Rome, separating American practice from Catholic orthodoxy, which separation has only increased since Vatican II.

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One Response to Interesting article about Archbishop Corrigan

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    From your linked article: Soon enough, that adaptation to the splintering effects of democracy would strain relations with Rome, separating American practice from Catholic orthodoxy, which separation has only increased since Vatican II.

    Before making such an assertion, one needs to understand what constitutes the true “Catholic orthodoxy” in question. Any honest examination of ecclesial history discovers several instances of marked changes from the church’s original (that is, orthodox) practice throughout the course of history.

    >> The first marked change occurred in the wake of Constantine’s acceptance of Christianity, when the church emerged from the underground to flourish in the mainstream.

    >> The second marked change occurred with the collapse of the Roman Empire, when ecclesial authority came into secular governance.

    >> The third marked change occurred in the eighth through twelfth centuries, when spiritual practices such as clerical celibacy, a shift to “ocular communion,” and an emphasis on pious devotions over popular participation in the liturgy started primarily in Spain and propagated gradually through the rest of the Roman Rite.

    >> The fourth marked change occurred with the reformation and counterreformation in the sixteenth century. The counterreformation, defending the practices introduced by the third marked change, caused those practices to become entrenched for four centuries.

    >> The fifth marked change occurred with the collapse of the papal states and consequent attempts to shore up the papal office in the face of its complete loss of secular authority.

    One can attempt to argue that the Second Vatican Council instigated a sixth marked change, but the reality is that the Second Vatican Council largely sought to fix what wasn’t working (correcting deficiencies in seminary formation, for example) and to restore what had been lost in the previous changes. The real question is whether, and to what extent, the American experience, in breaking from what became entrenched in the counterreformation, was really a break from orthodoxy and to what extent it might have been a restoration of orthodoxy.

    Norm.

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