New Liturgical Movement article on Anglican offices

David Clayton has a great article over at The New Liturgical Movement on The Power of the Divine Office to Transform a Church and Society.

He writes:

This reinforces my belief that that if we want to transform the culture and revive the Church, we can do this through the Domestic Church and the family centered on liturgical piety, including the chanting of the Liturgy of the Hours at home. Furthermore, this means that we need to encourage this in the vernacular, so that people who are not fluent in Latin (i.e. most people) can genuinely pray it. I suggest that the Anglican Use Divine Office is a way to do this, as I described in a review of the Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham. And it is the prayer of the family in the domestic church, centered on a liturgical piety, that can drive such societal change today as well as transform the Church. We need to form people as contemplatives as a matter of course, not as the exception.

I am not familiar with the Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham, but I do try to pray Mattins and Evensong at home daily using the Ordo our Deanery sends out once a month and the Canadian 1960 Book of Common Prayer.

I have a Psalter so some days I sing the Psalms and the Canticles.  It’s a great way to steep in Scripture, to renew one’s mind everyday in the faith, and the think with the Church.

 

 

 

 

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9 Responses to New Liturgical Movement article on Anglican offices

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    From your quotation: This reinforces my belief that that if we want to transform the culture and revive the Church, we can do this through the Domestic Church and the family centered on liturgical piety, including the chanting of the Liturgy of the Hours at home. Furthermore, this means that we need to encourage this in the vernacular, so that people who are not fluent in Latin (i.e. most people) can genuinely pray it.

    Amen! I agree completely.

    From your quotation: I suggest that the Anglican Use Divine Office is a way to do this…

    For those who belong to ordinariates established for former Anglicans, yes.

    For the rest of us, the Liturgy of the Hours of the Roman Rite, also available in an official English translation, is the appropriate rite. For those who don’t want to invest in the full four-volume set (which costs about $100 here in the States), there’s an approved edition called Christian Prayer that includes everything except the full set of readings for the Office of Readings (Vigils or Lauds, depending upon the time of day when one prays it) for about a fourth of the cost.

    Norm.

    • Foolishness says:

      For those of us in the Ordinariate, maintaining our habits of daily prayer and reading based on the Book of Common Prayer—which can be had for less than $20 in Canada (the 1962 edition) or the 1928 edition in the United States, are a simple, low cost way to develop daily habits of prayer

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Deborah,

        The use of the Book of Common Prayer is certainly an option for the laity of the ordinariates — but with a very significant caveat. The magisterium of the Catholic Church has not authorized any edition of the Book of Common Prayer for liturgical use, so praying the office according to any edition of the Book of Common Prayer would be a private devotion rather than true participation in the liturgical prayer of the church.

        I’m truly surprised that there is not already a volume called Divine Worship — The Liturgy of the Hours or Divine Worship — Morning Prayer and Evensong or something similar, especially in view of the centrality of Morning Prayer and Evensong in the Anglican tradition. However, AFAIK, the divine office of the Book of Divine Worship is still authorized for the ordinariates, if one can obtain a copy.

        Norm.

  2. EPMS says:

    What book is being used for the public saying of Morning/Evening Prayer in OCSP parishes? I note both are regularly offered at Annunciation, Ottawa.

  3. If you are looking for the office from the Book of Divine Worship, go here:
    http://www.bookofhours.org

    Deborah, is that ordo you speak of online? Does it have the collects from the Divine Worship Missal and a lectionary for the office?

    • Foolishness says:

      I don’t know. We get a hard copy once a month at our parish.

      • EPMS says:

        What differences, if any, have you noted between the printed rite the parish uses and the BCP rite you use privately?

      • Foolishness says:

        The printed ordo has the readings on it for the offices and I believe assumes the order of Morning Prayer or Evening Prayer found in the Prayer Book. And there are some changes in the canticles, which I do not obey. We used to pray the Te Deum every saint’s day, but now we’re told via the Ordo only to do so on Sundays and Solemnities. Instead the Benedictus Es is proposed. I pray the Te Deum more frequently because it was what we had done before and the BE isn’t even in our prayer book. If someone is able to persuade me this is in one of the other extant BCPs out there but if it merely imported from the Liturgy of the Hours to homogenize us, then I will resist. Really, the chancery should be happy there is at least one lay person in Canada who tries to pray the daily offices. And don’t even try to pry the King James Version out of my hands. I do mostly use the RSV-CE but there is nothing that more deeply expresses the Christian patrimony of the English-speaking world than the KJV that I hope is one day approved for Catholic use with any needed books or explanatory footnotes where translations are problematic.

  4. EPMS says:

    If the parish uses the rite available at the link ALG Bass gives above I can answer my own question.

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