First Anglican Catholic Church of Canada breakaway group holds Synod

Two years ago,  we experienced the first wave of parish splits or whole (but small) parish defections from the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada over Anglicanorum coetibus.

That breakaway group reformed as the Traditional Anglican Church of Canada and sought episcopal oversight from the Anglican Catholic Church–Official Province.  Anyway, they just held a synod and for those interested in what’s happened to  former parishioners and clergy here’s a link to the story.  There is an inaccurate statement though that Hepworth was involved in the beginning of the Traditional Anglican Communion back in the 1990s.  He was simply a priest and an advisor on unity since he spoke Italian.  The primate of the TAC then was Archbishop Louis Falk, who was a pioneer of TAC unity efforts.  Here’s the link and a short excerpt:

The Traditional Anglican Church of Canada, formed and incorporated in 2010 after the Ordinariate controversy divided the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada, has linked itself as a “missionary district” with the Anglican Catholic Church Original Province worldwide, while maintaining links as well with the Anglican Province of Christ the King. The Rev. Father Robert Mansfield of St John’s, Parry Sound, Ontario, convener of the synod, will serve as Vicar- General.

The province was taken at the young church’s initial synod, held October 23-25 at Queen of Apostles Renewal Centre in Mississauga near Toronto, Canada, ironically the location where an attempt was made earlier to form an Ordinariate in Canada.

-snip-
Archbishop Mark Haverland gave the address and charge to the ordinand. This was the third ordination to the diaconate this year for Canadian traditionalists: the others were of The Rev. Steven Beyer of Holy Trinity & St Jude, Thunder Bay, and The Rev. Jonathan Carrothers of St Mark’s, Victoria.

Archbishop Mark Haverland (ACCOP) presided at the meeting, which approved the “missionary” status of the Traditional Anglican Church of Canada unanimously. Thus the original eight parishes will be affiliated with 250 ACCOP parishes in the U.S., U.K., India, Africa, and Asia. The connection between St Mark’s in Victoria and the APCK, formed before the other parishes existed or had withdrawn from the ACCC, has the approval of Archbishop Haverland, who strongly supported the parish’s wish to continue this connection whilst maintaining full participation in the Canada-wide organisation. The two archbishops presented a united front and spoke movingly to the assembled clergy and lay leaders.

The theme of the synod was “Pastoral Availability and Organisational Stability,” and speakers from each of the parish described the efforts being made to implement the aims of the Traditional Anglican Church. A series of addresses on the theme given by The Rev. Father Stanley Sinclair of Victoria will be published.

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9 Responses to First Anglican Catholic Church of Canada breakaway group holds Synod

  1. Pingback: First Anglican Catholic Church of Canada breakaway group holds Synod | Catholic Canada

  2. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: Two years ago, we experienced the first wave of parish splits or whole (but small) parish defections from the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada over Anglicanorum coetibus.

    That breakaway group reformed as the Traditional Anglican Church of Canada and sought episcopal oversight from the Anglican Catholic Church–Official Province. Anyway, they just held a synod and for those interested in what’s happened to former parishioners and clergy here’s a link to the story.

    Fundamentally, I don’t understand why groups that left ordinariate-bound parishes of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) thought the continuing ACCC (Diocese of Canada) not to be a viable option.

    But in any case, this realignment of “continuing Anglicans” in Canada is very intersting, and it’s going to be even more interesting to see how it develops. There are several possibilities.

    >> 1. It’s possible that each of the “continuing Anglican” bodies could receive enough new members or baptize new converts into their number to become viable, but this seems very unlikely.

    >> 2. It’s possible that members will gravitate toward one or another of the “continuing Anglican” bodies over time, causing that body to gain enough members to become viable and the bodies that they abandon will fade into oblivion.

    >> 3. It’s possible that members gradually will realize that none of the “continuing Anglican” bodies are viable, and will gravitate to the Canadian deanery of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter, causing all of the “continuing Anglican” bodies to fade into oblivion.

    Of course, only time will tell.

    Norm.

    • Fr. David Marriott says:

      Norm, the groups which left the ACCC and which now form the Traditional Anglican Church of Canada – a Missionary District of the ACC, could not join the ‘continuing ACCC, as that group did not exist until the final months before the various sodalities were established under the then Bishop Wilkinson’s watch, when Bishop Botterill and Fr. Janzen et al made their decisions to maintain their Anglican status. Those who were under the patrimony of the Primate of the ACC or APCK had no option open to them when the Diocesan and the two Suffragans were all actively promoting the ordinariate option as the sole choice to be made.
      Perhaps it might be better to ask why those who chose to revive the ACCC did not talk to the ACC, or APCK themselves?

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Fr. David,

        You wrote: Norm, the groups which left the ACCC and which now form the Traditional Anglican Church of Canada – a Missionary District of the ACC, could not join the ‘continuing ACCC, as that group did not exist until the final months before the various sodalities were established under the then Bishop Wilkinson’s watch, when Bishop Botterill and Fr. Janzen et al made their decisions to maintain their Anglican status.

        From the very first public statement announcing the intent of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) to proceed union with the Catholic Church under the provisions of the apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus, Archbishop Hepworth stated clearly that the TAC would continue to provide pastoral services and episcopal oversight for all of its members who, for whatever reason, were not yet ready or able to proceed into the full communion of the Catholic Church, with the details thereof then still being worked out. In Canada, the arrangement became the continuing Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) and the continuing Diocese of Canada, transitioned to the interim leadership of Bishop Craig Botterill. Those who left to form other bodies clearly acted in undue haste, apparently displaying considerable animosity unbecoming of Christians toward those from whom they separated.

        You wrote: Those who were under the patrimony of the Primate of the ACC or APCK had no option open to them when the Diocesan and the two Suffragans were all actively promoting the ordinariate option as the sole choice to be made.

        It’s not clear to me that the TAC ever promoted full communion with the Catholic Church through the ordinariate structure as the sole choice. Rather, the pastoral letters from Archbishop Hepworth clearly stated otherwise.

        You wrote: Perhaps it might be better to ask why those who chose to revive the ACCC did not talk to the ACC, or APCK themselves?

        This is not exactly a matter of “reviving” the ACCC, as it never disbanded. The ACCC has maintained continuity. Indeed, Bishop Craig Botterill and former bishops Peter Wilkinson and Carl Reid deserve a lot of credit for the exemplary manner in which they handled the orderly restructuring of ACCC to form the Pro-Diocese of Our Lady of Walsingham for the members and parishes who elected to proceed into full communion of the Catholic Church and the subsequent Catholic reception of the communities and leaders of that pro-diocese.

        Further, I’ll say it again: those who joined an organization with an objective, publicly stated, of entering the full communion of the Catholic Church have no claim whatsoever of betrayal by leaders who succeeded in bringing that objective to reality. If those individuals did not intend to proceed into full communion with the organization, it is their decision to join the organization (that is, to join the ACCC) that was disingenuous. (Here, I am NOT speaking of those who intended to join, but who found that they legitimately needed more time to resolve various situations before doing so.)

        Norm.

  3. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: There is an inaccurate statement though that Hepworth was involved in the beginning of the Traditional Anglican Communion back in the 1990s.

    Upon reading the article, I found more errant statements.

    >> 1. The linked article says: “The appeal to the Vatican had actually been made by Evangelical bishops in the Church of England to the Vatican. Given the very cordial interaction through the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission, it was thought that a way might be found to establish a “uniate” relationship.” In reality, it was quite evident from Apostolicae curae that any such proposal would “dead on arrival” in Rome. The only way for the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) to obtain a different process would have been to obtain valid episcopal orders from another denomination that posesses valid apostolic succession, such as the Polish National Catholic Church (PNCC) or another body in the Union of Scranton or perhaps the Society of St. Pius X (SSPX), then have the bishops who received it proceed to (re)ordain all of its clergy and confirm all of its members who were not already validly confirmed.

    >> 2. The linked article says: “When the Vatican document was released the now former Archbishop John Hepworth and other bishops denied that it meant the necessity of becoming Roman Catholic [“we will be united, not absorbed”], although subsequent events showed that this was indeed expected.” The author here is, quite simply, in denial of what is in process. The error will become clear in a few months, but the author’s denial may well continue.

    >> 3. The linked article says: “So far there is no Ordinariate in Canada, but “fellowships” in Ottawa and Victoria, related to the “Anglican Use” and Ordinariate parishes in the U.S. One lone Anglican parish, historic St John the Evangelist, Calgary, has joined the “Anglican Use” group. At the moment these congregations have no clergy of their own but rely on regular R.C. clergy for ministrations. But in fact, Fr. Kenyon has already received ordination as a Catholic presbyter and now serves the Calgary community in that capacity. Further, the delay in Catholic ordination of former clergy of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) is directly due to the hesitation, at Archbishop John Hepworth’s direction, of the ACCC to commit to the process: when he gave the ACCC the “green light” to proceed, it was too late for the ACCC clergy to make the first group of ordinands for the ordinariate.

    I’m not sure that this list of misstatements in the article is complete, either.

    Norm.

  4. Muhayimana Aphrodis says:

    Father Archaishop Mark Haveland .You Are A Yaung Good And Your Adeas Is Very Good When Is Possible I Will Give Adeas For My Chruch And Me I Went To Take Anglican Catholic Chruch At Cyangugu Region So You Can Pray For Me Thank Archbichop And God Bless You And Your Family

  5. Rev,Fr.Ilyas says:

    Dear Brothers/Sisters:
    Warmly Christian greetings from Rev,Father,Ilyas S/o Nawab Punjab-Pakistan.
    Hope you and your blessed families,co-workers will be fine with the grace of God Amen.

    My dear i would like to bring into your very kind knowledge that St,Matthew’s Parish is a very new Anglican Catholic Parish,according to parish survey there are 13 christian widows (Age 56 to 60).
    These christian widows have proper jobs,but some are working under brick kiln owners and some are working as a daily wages in Muslim houses under their wives My dear friend,as you know Christian season is very near and they your help for Christmas food package.

    It is our humbly request to you,please St,Matthew’s provide them food package for their good Christmas,my dear without your cooperation St,Matthew’s parish is unable to provide them food package.

    St,Matthew’s parish and staff will be thankful you for this great help and favor.

    Wish you all the best.

    Yours In Jesus and Mary.
    Parish Priest:
    Rev,Fr.Ilyas S/o Nawab
    St,Matthew’s Parish
    Ward # 10,Chowk Azam
    Teh,Distt;Layyah
    Punjab-Pakistan.

  6. EPMS says:

    Are we sure this is not a variant of requests from Nigerian princesses? Does anyone have any independent information about “St Matthew’s”, such as its denominational affiliation?

  7. Norman McMullen, KStG says:

    Good afternoon,
    I am trying to locate The Rev. Herbert Coote [Brother Patrick James, S.S.J.E] I am wondering if anyone following this blog might be able to assist in my search. I believe he may have left the Anglican Church of Canada, now serving in one of the “breakaway” communities. Anny assistance you could provide would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. Norman McMullen, KStG

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