Msgr. Charles Pope exhorts men to be men

Great stuff.  Read the whole thing. Here’s a taste.

When I was growing up, my father would often exhort me to “be a man.” He would summon me to courage and responsibility and to discover the heroic capacity that was in me. St. Paul summoned forth a spiritual manhood with these words: We [must] all attain to the unity of faith and knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the extent of the full stature of Christ, so that we may no longer be infants, tossed by waves and swept along by every wind of teaching arising from human trickery, from their cunning in the interests of deceitful scheming. Rather, living the truth in love, we should grow in every way into him who is the head, Christ (Eph 4:13ff).

If the ladies will pardon me (for women have their own sort of strength), I want to issue a special summons to men,especially fathers, husbands, and priests. The summons is simple: be a man. We need men in these dark days, men who will heroically speak and act, men who will announce the truth and insist upon it wherever they have authority, men who will stop being passive fathers and husbands, priests who will stop “playing it safe” by remaining silent in the moral storm. Yes, be a man.

It has often been observed that men are rather disengaged from the practice of the faith and attendance at the Sacred Liturgy. Frankly, there is a reason—not a politically correct one, but a reason nonetheless. Most of the men I talk to find the Church rather feminized. There is much talk in the Church about forgiveness and love, about receptivity and about being “nicer.” These are fine virtues, all of them necessary. But men also want to be engaged, to be sent into battle, to go forth and make a difference.

After years of radical feminism, men are shamed for seeking to take up leadership and authority in their families and in the Church.

-snip-

Though many in past decades have sought to describe the Church as “male-dominated,” nothing could be further from the truth. Most parish leadership structures are dominated by women. And women do fine work. But the Church has done a very poor job of engaging men as men and equipping them to be strong husbands, fathers, and priests. Virtues related to bold leadership and the effective use of authority are in short supply whereas other virtues such as collaboration, listening, empathy, and understanding are overemphasized.

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2 Responses to Msgr. Charles Pope exhorts men to be men

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    From your quotation: It has often been observed that men are rather disengaged from the practice of the faith and attendance at the Sacred Liturgy. Frankly, there is a reason—not a politically correct one, but a reason nonetheless. Most of the men I talk to find the Church rather feminized. There is much talk in the Church about forgiveness and love, about receptivity and about being “nicer.” These are fine virtues, all of them necessary. But men also want to be engaged, to be sent into battle, to go forth and make a difference.

    Yes, and this is also quite manifest in the art and furniture that grace many cathedrals and parish churches — the dainty crucifix behind the altar and stations of the cross, the frilly altar and ambo, the feminine faces of our Lord and the apostles in many paintings, etc. Compare with the sturdiness and “noble simplicity” of the furnishings and the crucifix hanging over the altar in this abbey church, which have a much more masculine character.

    Also from your quote: After years of radical feminism, men are shamed for seeking to take up leadership and authority in their families and in the Church.

    And there are also more than a few cases of overt discrimination against men for lay pastoral positions. In a campus ministry for which I serve on an alumni-faculty advisory board, we have had several chaplains state that there’s a need for a female lay pastoral minister to deal with issues of sexuality that many female students feel uncomfortable discussing with men and, on occasion, to provide a female perspective for male students dealing with similar issues. Since there’s funding available for only one lay pastoral minister, men need not apply. I have no doubt that a similar dynamic exists in many parishes and in many other campus ministries as well.

    Norm.

  2. John Walter S. says:

    Watch out, he’s going to be censored for being insensitive to women.

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