News coming in from Toronto and Oshawa

UPDATE:  Here are some pictures from the reception of people from the Oshawa Parish of the Good Shepherd today.

Hello all.   I got a phone call today from a friend who attended the first Anglican Use Catholic Mass in Toronto, celebrated by Fr. Eric Roderigues, who then left for Oshawa where he assisted Toronto Auxiliary Bishop Vincent Nguyen in receiving about a dozen folks from the former Anglican Catholic Church of Canada’s Oshawa parish.

My Toronto friend said the Mass was said rather than sung; there were more than 20 people there, including about seven children.  The Toronto sodality now has a regular place of worship now, Sacré-Coeur Parish Church.

Our former ACCC priest from Prince Edward Island, Chris Lepage, was the cantor for the Oshawa Eucharist and Rite of Reception.

Carl Reid was busy in Ottawa assisting Fr. Francis Donnelly [I did get some pictures, but haven’t downloaded them yet], who celebrated our first Eucharist in since our reception into the Catholic Church last Sunday.   But his wife Barb drove down to Oshawa with her camera.  I hope to have photos and a more extensive report from Paul Nicholls who has passed along some preliminary information to me.

UPDATE:  Here’s Paul’s first report:

Today at the Church of St. Gregory the Great, Oshawa a number of members of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada were received into the Catholic Church by Bishop Vincent Nguyen of the Archdiocese of Toronto. Bishop Nguyen celebrated the Anglican Use mass. Former Anglican Church of Canada priests, Fr. James Tilley and Fr. David Garrett were received and assisted as altar servers during the course of the mass. Fr. Eric Rodrigues of the Archdiocese of Toronto also assisted at the mass. Rachel Mahon of Toronto served as the organist and Fr. Chris Lepage of the ACCC served as cantor. The mass was well attended by friends and family as well as by a number of Roman Catholics from the local Oshawa parishes. A number of members of the Oshawa fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order were also in attendance. A reception was held after the mass at the Church of the Good Shepherd. The group from now on will be known as the Sodality of the Good Shepherd. The congregants of the Sodality are most appreciative of the support they received from the Archdiocese and the clergy and people of St. Gregory the Great Church.
Fr. Eric Rodrigues will provide the weekly Anglican Use mass until former Anglican priests are ordained.

As I get pictures I will try to post them, though I have a busy writing day tomorrow.

Also, I hear there was a reporter from the Catholic Register in Oshawa taking lots of pictures, so if there is a published report on line I will supply a link.

Paul reported that after the Mass at St. Gregory’s in Oshawa, folks returned to Good Shepherd parish  (I guess it is now the Sodality of the Good Shepherd) for a reception and Fr. Eric brought the Blessed Sacrament into the Tabernacle there.

One of our former priests from Spencerville, Ontario, Doug Hayman and his family went to the reception of Anglicans by Kingston Archbishop Brendan O’Brien from Fr. Gerard Trinque’s parish of Christ the King at Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory.  I hope they brought a camera!

 

 

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50 Responses to News coming in from Toronto and Oshawa

  1. Rev22:17 says:

    Deborah,

    You wrote: Hello all. I got a phone call today from a friend who attended the first Anglican Use Catholic Mass in Toronto, celebrated by Fr. Eric Roderigues, who then left for Oshawa where he assisted Toronto Auxiliary Bishop Vincent Nguyen in receiving about a dozen folks from the former Anglican Catholic Church of Canada’s Oshawa parish.

    This is wonderful news!

    The Toronto group appears to be from the exploratory group that Archbishop Collins organized there rather than from the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC), so there are now two non-ACCC sodalities bound for the Canadian deanery.

    You quoted Paul as writing: Former Anglican Church of Canada priests, Fr. James Tilley and Fr. David Garrett were received and assisted as altar servers during the course of the mass.

    Is there a mistake here, or did Mssrs. James Tilley and David Garrett receive ordination in the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) and come to the ACCC from the ACC after receiving ordination as Anglican clergy? Both are listed on the March 2012 newsletter of the ACCC as having transferred to the Pro-Diocese of Our Lady of Walsingham….

    We also should watch especially for news from Calgary, where a major realignment of the former ACCC parishes of All Saints and Christ the King is in process. The March 2012 newsletter of the ACCC shows “The majority of All Saints and part of Christ the King” remaining in the Diocese of Canada and the rest of both parishes joining Fr Ernest Skublics (All Saints) and Fr Colin O’Rourke (Christ the King) in moving into the Pro-Diocese of Our Lady of Walsingham, with Fr Jim Schovanek (All Saints) then still undecided. There were also three priests in the list of undecided clergy with no parish or location; perhaps one of these was also in Calgary? In any case, I note that the ACCC web site now shows only one parish in Calgary (All Saints), so the two groups remaining in the Diocese of Canada apparently have merged. It also appears that the groups coming into the Catholic Church from both of these parishes may become part of the “Anglican Use” Parish of St. John the Evangelist, at least for now, rather than forming separate sodalities, though the parish certainly could set up missions for one or both of these groups if distance and transportation turns out to be a problem. The March 2012 ACCC newsletter indicates a date of 08 April (Easter Sunday) for the group coming from Christ the King with the date for the reception of the group coming from All Saints then still to be determined, but this difference probably is just an artifact of when the respective clergy had last submitted or updated the information.

    Norm.

    • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

      Norm,

      Fr. Schovanek is staying in the A.C.C.C. and becomes the Parish Priest for Calgary, with a congregation of about 80, some having come from the former Parish of Christ the King, which is now dissolved. Frs. O’Rourke and Skublics and Hilton (to my recollection) are coming over, but I don’t know the dates and have not seen reports. They are all going to St. John the Evangelist, former A.C.C. Parish, now having about 190 in the congregation.

      Fr. Howard Patterson, of Medicine Hat, keeps his community in the TAC.

      But there is another priest in the Calgary area whose name begins with an s. I haven’t heard about him.

      Moose Jaw, Sask., whose priest is now deceased, will stay in the TAC.

      P.K.T.P.

  2. Don Henri says:

    What about the Priest for the Toronto Sodality? I have heard that it includes a former ACC (not ACCC) Priest?

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Don,

      You asked: What about the Priest for the Toronto Sodality? I have heard that it includes a former ACC (not ACCC) Priest?

      That’s probably correct. The Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) did not have a parish or mission in Toronto, but there were some clergy from the Anglican Church of Canada in the exploratory group that Archbishop (now Cardinal) Collins organized there.

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        That probably accounts for the lack of any pictures or other coverage.

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        There were only four incomers from the Anglican Church of Canada, and none from the TAC. Cardinal Collins cobbled up a group by bringing in Latin Catholics who had converted years ago. The group is about 20 strong.

        P.K.T.P.

    • Geoff says:

      At least two – Peregrinus is a priest, and my own parish’s former honorary asst joined up after resigning. Prayers for those preparing for pastoral leadership in the Sodality of Bl. John Henry.

      • Don Henri says:

        And you? Sorry to sound so inquisitive, and I would totally understand if you can’t tell about it!
        + PAX et BONUM

  3. EPMS says:

    I am impressed that 20 people were in attendance, given the complete lack of publicity for an event that has been in the planning stages for over a year. Even the Toronto Ordinariate website is silent about this.

  4. Some who might ordinarily attend the Toronto group may have been in Oshawa to welcome the newcomers there.

  5. I think people from the Toronto group read this blog and it would be great for a report from one of them here.

    • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

      I should point out that Oshawa is in the Archdiocese of Toronto. The Cardinal-Archbishop sent an auxiliary Bishop to bring them over. I believe that the Oshawa group has, what, about 15 members? I’m not sure. It also has kept its church building, one of only two that are coming over (the other being at Ottawa). The church buildings at Halifax, N.S. and at Calgary stay in the A.C.C.C. The one in Vancouver does too but its priest is now ordinariate-bound (with 13 others), so it will have no priest, a reduced congregation and, I’ve heard, a hefty mortgage.

      P.K.T.P.

      • EPMS says:

        Most of the laypeople being received in Vancouver are parishioners of the church in Abbotsford, not the congregation with the church in Burnaby.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Peter,

        You wrote: It also has kept its church building, one of only two that are coming over (the other being at Ottawa).

        That’s a very interesting detail — and it also explains why the apostolic delegates in Canada and in the United States wanted to ensure that Catholic facilities would be made available to each group, if needed, during the formation process. Apparently this precaution is proving to be very prudent indeed!

        Norm.

  6. Lee Kenyon says:

    The ACCC parish of Christ the King, Calgary was dissolved on Palm Sunday. It’s former rector, Colin O’Rourke, together with five of his parishioners, were received into the full communion of the Catholic Church at St John the Evangelist, Calgary during the Easter Vigil. Several former parishioners from Christ the King had moved to St John’s in 2011, either prior to, or when we were beginning, our catechetical process, and were received with the majority of those at St John’s on 18 December.

    Tony Ward, former rector at All Saints, Calgary was received into full communion at St John’s back in January, together with six members of his family. Thus far, apart from the Ward family, only one past parishioner from All Saints has been received into the Catholic Church at St John’s (at the Easter Vigil). Dr Ernest Skublics, latterly the rector at All Saints, having been baptised and confirmed in the Catholic Church, was reconciled to the Church in Holy Week.

    All Saints, Calgary now continues as the ACCC parish in the city, with Fr Jim Schovanek as rector, assisted by Deacon Glenn Galenkamp.

    Photographs of the receptions at the Easter Vigil can be found on the “Pictures” page of the St John the Evangelist website, http://www.calgaryordinariate.com, under “Easter Vigil 2012”.

    Wonderful news from Oshawa and Toronto!

    Lee Kenyon
    Administrator
    St John the Evangelist, Calgary

    • Don Henri says:

      Let us pray that all those former Anglican Priests (even if concerning reconciled Catholic Fr. Skublics it may not be the case) will be ordained to the Catholic priesthood, so that new ordinariate communities can be established in Alberta.

      + PAX et BONUM

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Don,

        You wrote: … (even if concerning reconciled Catholic Fr. Skublics it may not be the case)…

        The text of Anglicanorum coetibus explicitly forbids only those who were ordained in the Catholic Church from exercising ordained ministry in the ordinariate. Those who left the Catholic Church prior to ordination are not excluded categorically, though Catholic authorities certainly may turn down some such individuals on other grounds.

        Norm.

      • Don Henri says:

        That’s why I said “may”. In the English ordinariate Fr. Ivan Aquilina was christened as a Catholic, and even (I believe) confirmed as such, then his mother had the whole family become Anglican. So it’s not totally impossible to have reconciled Catjolic former Anglican Priests ordained for ministry in the ordinariates.

        + PAX et BONUM

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Don,

        You wrote: That’s why I said “may”. In the English ordinariate Fr. Ivan Aquilina was christened as a Catholic, and even (I believe) confirmed as such, then his mother had the whole family become Anglican. So it’s not totally impossible to have reconciled Catjolic former Anglican Priests ordained for ministry in the ordinariates.

        Yes. Msgr. John Broadhurst of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham came from a similar background. The press release announcing the initial receptions for the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham on 01 January 2010 said that Bishop Alan Hopes made that distinction between him and the others.

        Norm.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Lee,

      The ACCC parish of Christ the King, Calgary was dissolved on Palm Sunday. It’s former rector, Colin O’Rourke, together with five of his parishioners, were received into the full communion of the Catholic Church at St John the Evangelist, Calgary during the Easter Vigil. Several former parishioners from Christ the King had moved to St John’s in 2011, either prior to, or when we were beginning, our catechetical process, and were received with the majority of those at St John’s on 18 December.

      Tony Ward, former rector at All Saints, Calgary was received into full communion at St John’s back in January, together with six members of his family. Thus far, apart from the Ward family, only one past parishioner from All Saints has been received into the Catholic Church at St John’s (at the Easter Vigil). Dr Ernest Skublics, latterly the rector at All Saints, having been baptised and confirmed in the Catholic Church, was reconciled to the Church in Holy Week.

      All Saints, Calgary now continues as the ACCC parish in the city, with Fr Jim Schovanek as rector, assisted by Deacon Glenn Galenkamp.

      Thank you for the update!

      There is much good news here, not only in the receptions of clergy and members from both parishes, but also in the bonds of unity that have formed between those individuals and your parish. Obviously the issue of how your parish and the Toronto ordinariate group would fit into an organization (deanery) of which the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) will constitute the preponderance of the membership has been a nagging concern. The fact that those coming from the ACCC in Calgary have folded into your parish bodes well!

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        ACCC clergy who were members of the Catholic church as adults were notified many months ago that they were ineligible for ordination. Fr Schovanek reported this on The English Catholic.

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        No, Norm, A.C. forbids former Latin priests from being incardinated into ordinariates. That is not the same thing as exercising ministry. By mutual agreement, the personal ordinary and the diocesan bishop could agree to allow one of the latter’s priests to exercise ministry in an ordinariate. By mutual agreement, ANY two bishops or local or proper ordinaries can do this. So it would be possible for a former Catholic TAC priest to be received into a local Diocese as a priest of that Diocese and then exercise ministry in the ordinariate (whether exclusively or not) with the agreement of his Bishop and that of the personal ordinary.

        P.K.T.P.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Peter,

        You wrote: No, Norm, A.C. forbids former Latin priests from being incardinated into ordinariates. That is not the same thing as exercising ministry.

        Actually, I misspoke. The explicit prohibition is in Article 6 of the <a href="http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20091104_norme-anglicanorum-coetibus_en.html&quot; rather than in the apostolic constitution itself.

        But here's the actual prohibition (boldface mine).

        “§2. Those who have been previously ordained in the Catholic Church and subsequently have become Anglicans, may not exercise sacred ministry in the Ordinariate. Anglican clergy who are in irregular marriage situations may not be accepted for Holy Orders in the Ordinariate.”

        So I think that my earlier comment was correct as to the terms of the prohibition.

        Norm.

    • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

      Dear Fr. Kenyon:

      There was another priest from the A.C.C.C. in the Calgary area whose name begins with an s: Skublics, Schovanek and … Can you remember? And what happened to him?

      P.K.T.P.

      • EPMS says:

        Skoyles

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        No, Norm, it is I who miswrote but you who are incorrect. By ‘exercise ministry in an ordinariate’, the clause means as a priest of that Ordinariate; hence the inclusion of ‘in an ordinariate’: it means as an incardinated member of that ordinariate. But a priest from any background who is incardinated in a diocese may be employed pastorally in an Ordinariate. Look to Article 9, Paragraph 2: “Where and when it is deemed suitable, clergy incardinated in a Diocese or in an Institute of Consecrated Life or a Society of Apostolic Life, with the written consent of their respective Diocese Bishop or their Superior, can collaborate in the pastoral care of the Ordinariate. In such case, they are subject to the Ordinary in respect to that which pertains to the pastoral charge or office they receive.”

        So, for instance, a former Roman was was subsequently part of the TAC or the Canterburian Communion, could return to Rome to be incardinated in the local Diocese (not the Ordinariate) and yet could carry out pastoral service for the Ordinary, provided that he had the requisite permission from his bishop. At the time A.C. was written, commentators refereed to Article 9 §2 as ‘the parachute clause’. Q.E.D.

        P.K.T.P.

      • Don Henri says:

        Dr. Perkins, Rome NEVER takes back as a Priest, wether in a diocese or any other structure, a RC Priest who as left in order to assume an ordained ministry in a separated ecclesial community. Period. Why do you always imagine the unimaginable? We reminds your idea to have a separate English ordinariate for the TAC… I would say it is sinful to make one’s imagination so much overwork and incessingly speculate publicly on things that cannot possibly happen: It may wound those directly concerned (and not making guesses from a safe place).

        + PAX et BONUM

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Don,

        You wrote: Rome NEVER takes back as a Priest, wether in a diocese or any other structure, a RC Priest who as left in order to assume an ordained ministry in a separated ecclesial community. Period.

        Actually, that’s not quite true.

        >> When the “iron curtain” across Europe collapsed, I think that Rome did welcome back clergy whom Communist authorities had forced into Orthodox bodies.

        >> Rome has also welcomed back bishops in the People’s Republic of China whom the Communist government there had forced to assist in episcopal ordinations that Rome had not approved.

        But there has to be some very compelling evidence of extreme situations.

        You wrote: We reminds your idea to have a separate English ordinariate for the TAC…

        That theoretically would be possible, as the apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus explicitly states that there may be more than one ordinariate within the territory of an episcopal conference while imposing no requirement whatsoever that they be territorial. Nonetheless, the reality is that The Traditional Anglican Church (TTAC) simply was not large enough to constitute “critical mass” for a separate ordinariate even if the whole of it had come into the Catholic Church.

        There’s a similar situation in Australia, where the Church of the Torres Strait has requested a separate ordinariate but is not really large enough to constitute “critical mass” therefor. It more likely will become a territorial deanery within the Australian ordinariate, perhaps with a parish or two outside of its official territory.

        Norm.

  7. Thanks for the update!

  8. Dom says:

    I tried to email Fr. Tilley in Oshawa to find out when this reception was to be and where, but did not hear back, so I couldn’t go. I attended this parish until last spring. I was received into the RCC last December as an individual. I just wished to attend as a moral supporter.
    Anyhow, it all seems good news from all around the country. Perhaps in time to come there will be either an ordinariate parish near me, or a Latin Mass at my parish. I have little hope for either though.

    • Paul Nicholls ofs says:

      Sorry, Dom, that you didn’t find out about the Oshawa reception. I could have provided you with the information, easily. I am sorry about your situation, not having an Ordinariate Church nearby or a Latin Mass church.

      For purposes of joining the Ordinariate, you can always become an affiliate with the Sodality of the Good Shepherd, while attending mass at the RCC. You need only show up at Oshawa, once in awhile.

      I have now left my RCC parish and registered as a parishioner of the Sodality of the Good Shepherd. To make things more official I submitted my baptism and confirmation certificates and proof that I was an Anglican Church of Canada member 30 years ago.

      There is also another lady who is RCC and a former Anglican who may join the parish. Also, a number of cradle RCC members expressing an interest in the Anglican Use Mass.
      There is potential for growth in Oshawa, but much work to be done.

      I enjoyed your company at the Mississauga Anglicanorum Coetibus Conference back in March 2011 and look forward to seeing you at some point in the future.

      You are not alone You and not alone and we, at Good Shepherd, are with you in spirit. I will pray for your needs and intentions as I am sure the other members of the Sodality will.

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Paul,

        You wrote: There is potential for growth in Oshawa, but much work to be done.

        Yes, all of the “Anglican Use” congregations now coming into the Catholic Church in the United States and in Canada should be prepared for substantial growth.

        >> 1. It is very likely that many of the former Anglicans who came into the Catholic Church in the past will choose to join “Anglican Use” congregations near to them.

        >> 2. It is also very likely that both members of the respective provinces of the Anglican Communion, Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) and The Episcopal Church (TEC) here in the States, and members of various “continuing Anglican” bodies will come into the Catholic Church through these congregations in fairly significant numbers, as is happening in several communities of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham.

        Of course, it’s also likely that more clergy and congregations of the respective provinces of the Anglican Communion and various “continuing Anglican” bodies will ask to come into the Catholic Church through the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter and its Canadian deanery. My instinct is that it will be only a matter of time until the Canadian deanery spins off into a separate ordinariate.

        BTW, has anybody heard any news about the canonical erection of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross in Australia?

        Norm.

    • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

      Dear Don Henri:

      There is absolutely nothing fanciful in what I wrote. While a returning Latin may not be incardinated into an Anglican Ordinariate, he may certainly serve in one with the agreement of both the Ordinary and his local Bishop. I was thinking of the case of a Catholic layman who left the Catholic Church to become a cleric in a non-Catholic Church. Under A.C., such a person may not come into an ordinariate, for he must return to the local diocese of the Latin Church, for he came from the territorial dioceses and therefore ‘belongs’ to them. However, he could subsequently be ordained priest in a local diocese and then work in the ordinariate with the agreement of his local bishop and the personal ordinary. That follows from the passage I quoted. I was not thinking of a man who was already a priest when he left the Catholic Church. So there could be lay Catholics who left the Catholic Church to join the TAC, were ordained in the TAC, and now wish to serve in the ordinariates as priests. They will not be allowed to become incardinated in any ordinariate. But, if ordained as Catholic priests, while they would be incardinated in local dioceses, they could still serve in an ordinariate with the permission of their own bishops and the personal ordinary concerned.

      It is always the case that priests incardinated in one see may serve in another, whether the other is territorial or personal (e.g. the Campos structure) or quasi-pesonal (such as a military ordinariate). In fact, I know a priest who is incardinated in the Archdiocese of Ottawa and yet served in the Military Ordinariate of Canada, and several of the Campos priests (who belong to an entirely personal structure) work in local dioceses in Brazil with permission from Bishop Rifan and the local bishop. In fact, the principle is so entrenched that a Latin priest may serve and minister in an Eastern Catholic Church (or vice versa) with the permission of both bishops involved, provided, of course, that he has bi-ritual faculties.

      P.K.T.P.

      P.K.T.P.

  9. Toronto AU Catholic says:

    Hello All,

    As a member of the Toronto Sodality (and father to four of the seven kids there), I am pleased to report that we will be holding weekly AU Masses at Sacre Couer Parish Church in downtown Toronto (381 Sherbourne St, corner of Carlton – parking lot immediately to the north of the Church) at 1:45 p.m. on Sundays.

    Our first public (and sung) Mass will be on May 6th (we will be having a said Mass on April 29th at 1:45 p.m.) All are welcome, although please expect some degree of managed chaos on our part during these first few weeks! We are hosting a children’s program and a coffee hour afterward in the parish hall.

    We are still in the “construction phase” of getting ourselves properly organized, but you can expect more formal word from us – including by way of a website.

  10. Toronto AU Catholic says:

    Norm,

    I can’t speak for the rest of the Toronto group, but the fact that our backgrounds are predominantly ACC while most of the other groups are former ACCC shouldn’t be an issue. A contingent of us have visited the St. Edmund’s folks in Cambridge and were quite warmly received, and, personally speaking, I am humbled and inspired by their 30+ year journey to this point.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Toronto AU Catholic,

      You wrote: I can’t speak for the rest of the Toronto group, but the fact that our backgrounds are predominantly ACC while most of the other groups are former ACCC shouldn’t be an issue. A contingent of us have visited the St. Edmund’s folks in Cambridge and were quite warmly received, and, personally speaking, I am humbled and inspired by their 30+ year journey to this point.

      That’s very encouraging!

      Unfortunately, when there’s a relatively small number of outsiders coming into a group who know each other well, it’s always far too easy for those in the larger group to turn to one another in familiar ways and thus, perhaps inadvertently, to exclude the newcomers. I sincerely pray that fraternal relations among the various groups coming into the new ordinariates will continue to flourish in a spirit of Christian fellowship and charity and that all will make a conscientious effort to include and welcome one another.

      In a previous post, you said: We are still in the “construction phase” of getting ourselves properly organized, but you can expect more formal word from us – including by way of a website.

      I pray that it will go well!

      Norm.

      • Toronto AU Catholic says:

        Hi Norm,

        The very fact you are airing this concern shows a measure of the good will former ACCers should expect from their ACCC brethren!

        Our group has felt a little isolated from the goings-on in the ACCC, but only because it was a different body of worshippers grappling with its own issues. That should change as we form into the Canadian deanery of the U.S. Ordinariate.

        Thank you for your prayers and well wishes. And if you happen to be in downtown Toronto on a Sunday afternoon, make sure to drop by!

      • Rev22:17 says:

        Toronto AU Catholic,

        You wrote: The very fact you are airing this concern shows a measure of the good will former ACCers should expect from their ACCC brethren!

        Unfortunately, I’m not in a position to influence these matters and what should happen often is not what actually does happen.

        You wrote: Our group has felt a little isolated from the goings-on in the ACCC, but only because it was a different body of worshippers grappling with its own issues. That should change as we form into the Canadian deanery of the U.S. Ordinariate.

        Ideally, yes. Again, I hope and pray that this will be the reality.

        JTOL, your group would do well to forge bonds of fellowship and collaboration with the Oshawa group. Until I looked at a map after reading in another comment that Oshawa is within the Archdiocese of Toronto, I did not realize that it was only about twenty miles away. While that might be a bit far for folks to travel for normal services, chatechesis, etc., it’s certainly close enough so each community can join in celebrations that are of special significance to the other and the two communities can collaborate in many areas of ministry. By way of example, there’s no reason why the two communities can’t come together for training for liturgical ministers, for a day of recollection, or for a community picnic/barbeque in the summertime.

        You wrote: Thank you for your prayers and well wishes.

        You’re welcome!

        You wrote: And if you happen to be in downtown Toronto on a Sunday afternoon, make sure to drop by!

        Will do!

        Norm.

  11. Charles A. Coulombe says:

    I was at the reception in Oshawa. It was splendid, many parishioners from St. Gregory the Great were very pleased by the liturgy, and one of my best friends was received – the following day (yesterday) we went to Mass together at the Toronto Oratory. Really a blessing all round!

    • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

      Dear Mr. Coulombe:

      Long time, no hear!, fellow monarchist! Was Fr. Le Page of P.E.I. received?

      Peter Karl T. Perkins
      Victoria, Canada

      • Charles A. Coulombe says:

        Sorry not to get back to you! He received communion, so he must have done.

  12. Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

    A Caption says that Fr. Le Page, a *former* A.C.C.C. priest, was cantor at the Reception Mass in Oshawa. Was he received there? Has he been received yet? Still no answer on this. Someone must know. Who was present at Oshawa last Sunday?

    P.K.T.P.

    • EPMS says:

      The Cavendish Breeze Inn, Mr. Le Page’s B&B, has an email address easily found on the web. Why don’t you get in touch?

      • Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

        I tried there but he the listed e-mail address is defunct.

        P.K.T.P.

  13. Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

    Edmonton:

    Does anyone know if the Ordinariate-bound group from Edmonton has come over? It had included Frs. David Skelton & Bryan Donegan.

    P.K.T.P.

    • Rev22:17 says:

      Peter,

      You asked: Does anyone know if the Ordinariate-bound group from Edmonton has come over?

      That’s a good question. The March 2012 issue of the Archdiocsean Newsletter of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (ACCC) indicates that Frs. Skelton and Donegan and the Fellowship of Blessed John Henry Newman in Edmonton were scheduled to come into the Catholic Church on 15 April, but I have not seen any news anywhere about this.

      The same newsletter also indicates that the following clergy and communities are planning to come into the Catholic Church on dates to be determined.

      * Christ the King, Tyendinaga (Fr Gérard Trinque)

      * St Athanasius, Montreal (Fr Doug Nicholson, Fr. Oswald Slattery)

      * Holy Cross, Sydney Forks (Fr Charles Warner)

      * St Thomas More, Charlottetown (Fr Chris Le Page)

      I found the following through a web search this morning.

      >> From the St. Barnabas News Archive: On Sunday, APRIL 22nd, 2012, at 3:00 p.m. in Holy Name of Mary Roman Catholic Church, Marysville, Archbishop Brendan O’Brien of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kingston, will receive clergy and members of the Anglican Catholic Parish of Christ the King, Tyendinaga into the Catholic Church.

      Does anybody know that this actually happened?

      And does anybody know anything about the status of the rest of these congregations and clergy?

      Norm.

      • EPMS says:

        Fr Nicholson and the congregation in Montreal are shown in the list of those remaining in the ACCC in the May ACCC Diocesan newsletter. The other three clergy are gone from the list. I am not sure what congregations, besides the members of Christ the King, would be involved. Holy Cross has not had held any services since early 2011. St Thomas More was always shown as “Phone for details. “.

  14. Peter Karl T. Perkins says:

    Don Henri:

    On your assertion that Rome never takes back a priest who has defected and seeks to return from being a priest in another denomination, I cannot comment on how often exceptions have been made but I understand that there have been a few rare cases. One must think with the Church. The Church does not have a positivistic attitude towards law. The reason for this rule must be kept in mind; the law is to be read with the mens of the Church. The purpose of the law was to prevent troubled or troublesome priests from leaving their bishops and then trying to return to the Church through a back door, as it were. In the case of the TAC, this was obviously not applicable. Those who left had no reason to suppose that they would ever be returning. For that reason, it would have been completely appropriate for the Church to have dispensed with that provision of law just for the first generation of TAC incomers (i.e. ‘grandfathering’). Had this been done, the entire TAC would be coming over, instead of only half of it, with half its property. The Pope asked that the m.p. be interpreted and applied “generously”. But, as a Latin Mass Catholic, I knew that that would fall on the deaf ears of the man appointed to run the C.D.F. Some apples are rotten to the core. I suppose that there’s no point in griping about it now. Measures were taken by the leftists in the C.D.F. to decimate the TAC, and this worked (divide and conquer): it broke the TAC into three factions (those crossing, those staying, and those going Protestant to Haveland-Provence). Nevertheless, those who decided to cross over anyway made the right choice. While I must agree with that decision, I am allowed to sympathise with the stay-ons, and I do so. They are also our blood brothers in Christ. I pray that, one day, they may also find a place in the Pope’s house, a place erected for them in justice and charity.

    P.K.T.P.

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